for the next 10 years i dealt with it. noticing my hair getting thinner with every passing year. a quick side note, my father is bald and my mother has always had beautiful, thick wavy locks. taking in to account that the supposed gene for hair is carried maternally, i was confused because my maternal grandmother who passed at age 86 had the most abundant set of thick hair i’d ever seen. it just didn’t make sense to me and only served to depress me more. my mother has since developed traction alopecia, due to her pulling her hair tightly back daily, for work, for years. she has since kept her hair short, but mine looks worse. back to where i left off. at 34 i decided to go to one of the hair restoration places. they took pictures and walked me through the process. it was an odd place, though. small, small place. one guy. said i was a good candidate. he showed me pictures of what my hair loss would possibly look like in another 10 years. i started sobbing. it felt more like a scare tactic than anything so i left, and decided against it, for the time being. still haven’t gone back.
Mistakenly thought of as a male disease, around 40% percent of women will suffer from some form of hair loss by the age of 50. A woman’s hair is an important part of her aesthetic make-up. It represents her style and taste, and frames her face while accentuating her best features. Unfortunately, most physicians don’t have answers or solutions for women who begin to lose their hair.  Plano, TX hair restoration surgeon, Dr. Joseph Yaker, understands that this can be extremely catastrophic to a woman’s self-confidence, body image and quality of life. Clinical studies have shown that psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety are more common in people with hair loss, especially women. 

Current evidence suggests that alopecia areata is caused by an abnormality in the immune system that damages hair follicles. This particular abnormality leads to autoimmunity, a misguided immune system that tends to attack its own body. As a result, the immune system attacks particular tissues of the body. In alopecia areata, for unknown reasons, the body's own immune system attacks the hair follicles and disrupts normal hair formation. Biopsies of affected skin show immune lymphocytes penetrating into the hair bulb of the hair follicles. Alopecia areata is occasionally associated with other autoimmune conditions such as thyroid disease, vitiligo, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, and ulcerative colitis. The diagnosis or treatment of these diseases is unlikely to affect the course of alopecia areata. Sometimes, alopecia areata occurs within family members, suggesting a role of genes.

Laser devices: Brushes, combs, and other hand-held devices that emit laser light might stimulate hair growth. These devices might make hair look more youthful in some people. Because the FDA classifies these products as medical devices, the products do not undergo the rigorous testing that medicines undergo. The long-term effectiveness and safety for these devices are not known.


I had Melanoma a few years ago, a wide-excision surgery and lymph node(s) removal. I also had sleep apnea and then surgery for that. Also had a hysterectomy 10 years ago for excessive bleeding,I’ve had the clotting factor tests w/normal results though even though even having my blood taken will cause me to bleed alot and bruise.Each time I’ve had surgery, I’ve had to stay in Recovery a looong time because of the bleeding.(hence the clotting tests) Have been anemic most of my adult life too.I am under a lot of stress(have always been) I mention all this in case it rings a bell w/anyone else.
Diphencyprone (DPCP): This medicine is applied to the bald skin. It causes a small allergic reaction. When the reaction occurs, a patient has redness, swelling, and itching. Dermatologists believe this allergic reaction tricks the immune system, causing it to send white blood cells to the surface of the scalp. This fights the inflammation. It also prevents the hair follicles from going to sleep, and causing the hair loss.
Hello ladies, I’m 32 yrs old and suffering from hair thinning. My hair just seems to have stopped growing. It’s now half of what it used to be 2 years ago! GP did some extensive tests, nothing came out. Might be birth control (on Quasense for 2 years – hair thinning started after that) but can’t stop it (it’s the only BC that’s worked for my very horrible cramps). Anyway, any suggestions for doctors (dermatologists/endo/any other) in San Francisco Bay Area or somewhere in California?
i also have learned that most people are low in their vitamin d levels, which may also contribute to hair loss. i actually had labs done to check for my vitamin d level, by a cardiologist. my heart is fine, thankfully, but she did tell me to take 2000i.u. daily of vitamin d3, specifically. when i researched about it, i found the possible hair connection. so i do take that daily. i will also be buying vitamin b6 and 12 and biotin. and i will research the gut connection because biologically speaking, it makes sense. i will return with another post in a few months and update.
Family history will often tell the doctor what type of alopecia a person has. Occasionally, a punch biopsy may be necessary to determine the type of hair loss. Looking at plucked hairs under a microscope can help to tell the difference between alopecia areata and androgenic alopecia. Other tests might be done to check for autoimmune diseases like lupus that can accompany alopecia.

Hi Everyone I thought I was the only person with major hairloss because everywhere I look all I see is beautiful heads of hair. I am 34 years old and my hair started thinning 7 months ago at first I thought it was just my ponytail getting thinner but my hair became horrible with split ends and dryness too (I have always had extremely healthy hair and never had split ends) – I thought I had burnt my hair using a straightener and that’s why it was thinning. However it has gotten worse and worse and I finally visited a doctor. I have had full blood tests for thyroid issues, hormone levels, cholesterol etc etc all were perfectly normal, I had a thyroid antibody test which was at the high end of normal but still within normal range, I had a thyroid function test which was within normal limits however he thought I did have some slight inflammation ie thyroiditis. My doctor said this isn’t causing the hair loss either. I have loads of energy, don’t get tired, eat well am normal weight range the only other thing I have noticed is my eyelashes seem stunted in growth (not thinned out though) and my eyebrows have thinned on the outer edges. My last two nails on both hands have a dark (looks like they have lifted slight) strip just below the white nail part. I am booked to have a stress test, pelvic ultrasound and to see an endocrinologist also to rule out all other possible reasons for hairloss. I am now getting to the point of embarrassment to go out it is soooo thin on top particularly on one side of temple and majorly down the centre where I used to part my hair. HELPPPPPP!!!!!
although I have plenty of hair round the sides I was rather thin on top, and quite bald on the crown. So I started using onion juice to kick start the folicles. Then after, started to use juiced ginger. After a minute or so of either application I rubbed in coconut oil, and left the mixture on for an hour or so. Problem with wishing to see the hair growth as soon as possible, hair is slow growing and new hair is even slower, so one will have to wait 3 months for a good result. So, once or twice a week use onion and the same with the ginger. I found white onions are best, grate on the smallest hole ( not much needed)…..bonus, white hair turns black.

Hair changes about as fast as grass grows, which is to say it’s extraordinarily slow and not visible to anyone checking impatiently in the mirror every day. But during regular follow-up appointments, Harklinikken uses high-tech equipment to photograph and magnify the scalp and count new hairs and active follicles, which motivates users to adhere to the regimen. Too many people give up on treatments like Rogaine and low-level-light devices before they’ve had a chance to work, Dr. Senna said.
The main type of hair loss in women is the same as it is men. It's called androgenetic alopecia, or female (or male) pattern hair loss. In men, hair loss usually begins above the temples, and the receding hairline eventually forms a characteristic "M" shape; hair at the top of the head also thins, often progressing to baldness. In women, androgenetic alopecia begins with gradual thinning at the part line, followed by increasing diffuse hair loss radiating from the top of the head. A woman's hairline rarely recedes, and women rarely become bald.
There is no cure for the condition.[2] Efforts may be used to try to speed hair regrowth such as cortisone injections.[1][2] Sunscreen, head coverings to protect from cold and sun, and glasses if the eyelashes are missing is recommended.[2] In some cases the hair regrows and the condition does not reoccur.[2] In others hair loss and regrowth occurs over years.[2] Among those in whom all body hair is lost less than 10% recover.[5] 

I suspect Hypervitaminosis A for my hair loss due to prolonged use of a high dosage of Retin A but I can’t find anyone who will test me. I had a PAINFUL scalp, too sensitive to touch and unbearable itching. I stopped the Retin-A 2 months ago and the scalp pain and a lot of itching stopped a week afterwards. I saw a PCP and 3 derms. All recognized hair loss but shrugged it off as hormonal or a lack of deep conditioning! Please avoid these NYC doctors at all costs:
I am 20 and have been losing hair since I was 17. It is such a confidence killer. I really do miss my beautiful thick and black hair. Now my hair is thin and a bit gray as well. I only think of it sometimes…but I used to be so depressed i can barely get out of bed. Whenever I am talking to someone, I always wonder if they are looking at my hair. I am currently using Rogaine for Women…it worked one summer when I was following the regimen religiously. However, I am so bad with routines, so now I try to remember to put it on my scalp morning and night. I recently also started to take Shen Min Hir Nutrients…not sure if it works yet. Does anyone have any advice? I really want to get a hair biopsy but I don’t know how. The places I called offered scalp analysis to prepare for hair transplants…which is not something that I am considering. I also saw 2 derms, one didn’t know what was wrong and only offered Rogaine as a solution, and the other said it is androgenic alopecia. I think I might have hormonal problems, but really not that sure. My scalp is always oily and so is my skin. Before my hairloss, I had really itchy scalp. Now it’s still oily but I wash it every other day. I also dye my hair to hide the gray. Sometimes I just feel so ugly and depressed in thinking about my hair. Beautiful hair is the only thing that I want back.
It is perfectly normal for people to shed 50 to 100 hairs per day. This generally doesn't cause noticeable thinning of scalp hair because new hair is growing in at the same time that hair is shedding. However, hair loss occurs when this hair growth cycle and shedding is disrupted or when the hair follicle becomes destroyed and replaced with scar tissue. Female pattern hair loss (androgenetic alopecia) is the most common form of hair loss in women. This occurs gradually and is caused by genetics (from either side of the family), age, and the action of a specific male hormone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT). This hormone is found in lesser amounts in women and it preys on the hair follicles, preventing them from receiving vital nutrients for proper hair follicle growth, leading to the hairs shrinking, and resulting in a shorter lifespan. Interestingly, DHT does not need to be elevated to generate hair loss. Estrogen, when lowered as commonly seen in menopause, creates a change in the ratio of male to female hormones, giving an edge to these male hormones. Compounded with the sensitivity of DHT to the hair follicles, heredity can affect the age at which a woman begins to lose her hair, as well as the rate of hair loss and the extent of baldness. 
Finally people who understands what I am going through …I am in a desperate search for doctors in the Miami/Boca Raton, Florida area. Can anyone help? I dont know yet what has been causing my hair loss…I had been loosing some hair throighout the years, and sometimes it gets lees severe but lately has just gotten worse and there is no stopping it seems. I had mt Tyroid checked by PCP a coulpe months ago and my iron level also looked normal …getting desperate. Would appreciate some help.
Onion - A study published in the Journal of Dermatology examined the results when onion juice was used in people with alopecia areata. Twenty-three people applied onion juice directly to the scalp twice daily for two months. Participants began to experience hair growth after just two weeks of treatment. At four weeks, hair regrowth was seen in 17 people and at six weeks, hair growth was apparent in 20 people.
so here i am. i’m ready to try the spiro, alone, especially after reading your posts. i’ve thought of shaving my head, and i may be closer to doing that. i keep my hair in a short bob since it helps not having it knot up when it’s longer, due to its fineness. i try to let it air dry, but blow drying it, upside down, adds volume. plus my curls do not really form anymore because of the texture. i have never counted my lost hairs individually, but i don’t need to have an exact number since just eyeballing what comes out every time i wash, comb, or just touch my hair is stressful enough. it’s hard to be in the sun. we hung out at a garden for Easter yesterday and the sun was burning my scalp. i have tried expensive shampoos, but nothing. i may look in to the toppik. i used to use this bumble and bumble brown hair powder, but since it didn’t quite match my color (it’s only available in three shades) it didn’t look so convincing. the toppik makes more sense since it’s a fibrous material.
Furthermore, Penn dermatopathologists developed an even more advanced method called the HoVert technique for diagnosing hair loss and other disorders from a scalp biopsy. The technique uses a unique horizontal and vertical testing approach that provides a greater amount of information to the referring dermatologist than standard industry longitudinal scalp biopsies.

As much as 30 percent of women will experience some sort of hair thinning, usually first noticed with age as a skinnier ponytail or a little more visible scalp peeking out. Thick hair screams “youth,” which makes thinning a tough pill to swallow. But there are many ways you can help slow down thinning and hair loss, from eating the right foods to cutting back on stress, even strategically styling your locks. Here, seven ways to stave off hair loss and keep your ‘do looking young and healthy for longer. 
Hi everyone. I started losing my hair about 6 months ago. First noticed about the size of a fifty cent piece gone from the crown of my head. (Don’t know why my beautician didn’t tell me about it) but went to a dermatologist right away. She started treatmentschool to the head. (Injected my bald spots with tiny needles) sorry at this time I don’t know what she injected it with, will ask next week as I go for another treatment. I also put Fluocinonide 0.05% solution on every night on every circle of hair loss. I have the treatments once a month.

I’m 42 and I noticed my front top and sides thinning about a year ago – a lot coming out when brushing after washing. I went to the doctor who happened to be African-American (I’m caucasion) and she actually asked me if I wore “corn rows” a lot! Needless to say, she was worthless and just prescribed me something for dandruff, which I do not have! I went to an endocrinologist to see if my thyroid or menopause was the problem – tests turned out honky dorie! Now I can see through the top of my head when the sun shines on it (scar-y) and I’m having to cover over the temple areas with sweeps of hair from the other side (interesting, the right side is much thinner). I will say that I’ve gone through hell and back with a mentally ill young adult but if it was stress, wouldn’t it have come out quicker than just in the last year (I’ve been dealing with his illness for 7 years now)?? I’ve heard that sometimes it takes 2 or 3 blood tests and doctors to finally see that one has thyroid problems. Is this the experience of others, and would I be throwing my money away by seeing my general practitioner? 

The views expressed in this article intend to highlight alternative studies and induce conversation. They are the views of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of hims, and are for informational purposes only, even if and to the extent that this article features the advice of physicians and medical practitioners. This article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice.
I have had alopecia universalis for 12 years now. It was very difficult in the beginning when my hair began to fall out. I was in college and devastated because I thought my life was over. I have now grown to accept myself and the way I look now. I know I would not be who I am today without this having happened, and I really like me! It does get better, but it is a process. A good support system and love from family and friends gets you through. Good luck to you all on your journey.

Wow, I just started doing some research on this because I have been having problems with my hair thinning on the top of my head for several years, along with some sensitivity. I went to my internal medicine Doctor and he didn’t say much, which struck me as odd… he referred me to my women’s doctor who was slightly more sypathetic but offered no suggestions other than to see a dermatologist. I have been putting it off because I feel like I am getting the run-around. I see that I am not alone!
Hi, I’m 25 years old, and started having hair loss at 15. It started and has continued to thin around my hairline only on one side, to the point that one side is receded and extremely thin. About a year and a half ago, my overall scalp started thinning as well. It’s been about a year since I’ve dyed my hair and I rarely ever put hairspray or any other chemical in my hair. I try to just wash it and let it air dry in fear that anything I do will make more hair fall out. I haven’t been to a doctor at all so far because I’ve never had health insurance. I’m about to have insurance next month and will be looking for a doctor to go to ASAP. I’ve been trying to look online and see what information I can find about what’s happening with me, but I dont’ see anything about a similar case to mine. I used to have long, thick hair and could do anything with it, and now it’s short and thin, and I can never style it at all, and my receding hairline on my right side has me so self conscious. I live in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, does anyone have any suggestions to my situation or a reputable doctor in this area?
Androgenetic alopecia (AGA), or male-pattern baldness, is hair thinning in an “M”-shaped pattern; hair loss occurs on the temples and crown of the head with sparing of the sides and back5 (Figure 2). This pattern reflects the distribution of androgen-sensitive follicles in most people.6 Starting at puberty, androgens shorten the anagen phase and promote follicular miniaturization, leading to vellus-like hair formation and gradual hair thinning.6
Dr. Curtis says genes and hormones are the leading causes of hair loss.  And it's not just something we face as we age.  She says, "I've seen patients as young as 14-15 years old start having hair loss. It's all dependent on your genetics. Unfortunately the earlier it starts, the more likely it's going to be more severe in nature and the faster it can progress."
A hair growth cycle consists of three phases. During the anagen phase, hair grows actively. This phase may last for years. During the catagen phase, hair stops growing and separates from its follicle, which is the structure beneath the skin that holds the hair in place. The catagen phase lasts about 10 days. During the telogen phase, the follicle rests for two or three months, and then the hair falls out. The next anagen phase begins as a new hair grows in the same follicle. Most people lose 50 to 100 hairs per day as part of this natural cycle.
Hair changes about as fast as grass grows, which is to say it’s extraordinarily slow and not visible to anyone checking impatiently in the mirror every day. But during regular follow-up appointments, Harklinikken uses high-tech equipment to photograph and magnify the scalp and count new hairs and active follicles, which motivates users to adhere to the regimen. Too many people give up on treatments like Rogaine and low-level-light devices before they’ve had a chance to work, Dr. Senna said.
Hi, i am only 26 and i’ve been losing so much hair everyday. I used to have a thick and wavy hair, it was shiny as far as i can remember but now my scalp is visible, my hair is kinky and super thin. My friends always ask what happened to my hair and i don’t have aby explaination apart from stress. I haven’t seen any doctor that specialized with hair loss yet but based in the posts that i am seeing i guess there’s no doctor that could tell the root cause of our hair loss problem. I really think i’m too young to be losing all my hair..it’s really depressing that i am losing my self esteem going out with my officemates. After work i would rather go straigth home that entertain there questions about my hair.
As much as 30 percent of women will experience some sort of hair thinning, usually first noticed with age as a skinnier ponytail or a little more visible scalp peeking out. Thick hair screams “youth,” which makes thinning a tough pill to swallow. But there are many ways you can help slow down thinning and hair loss, from eating the right foods to cutting back on stress, even strategically styling your locks. Here, seven ways to stave off hair loss and keep your ‘do looking young and healthy for longer. 
It is perfectly normal for people to shed 50 to 100 hairs per day. This generally doesn't cause noticeable thinning of scalp hair because new hair is growing in at the same time that hair is shedding. However, hair loss occurs when this hair growth cycle and shedding is disrupted or when the hair follicle becomes destroyed and replaced with scar tissue. Female pattern hair loss (androgenetic alopecia) is the most common form of hair loss in women. This occurs gradually and is caused by genetics (from either side of the family), age, and the action of a specific male hormone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT). This hormone is found in lesser amounts in women and it preys on the hair follicles, preventing them from receiving vital nutrients for proper hair follicle growth, leading to the hairs shrinking, and resulting in a shorter lifespan. Interestingly, DHT does not need to be elevated to generate hair loss. Estrogen, when lowered as commonly seen in menopause, creates a change in the ratio of male to female hormones, giving an edge to these male hormones. Compounded with the sensitivity of DHT to the hair follicles, heredity can affect the age at which a woman begins to lose her hair, as well as the rate of hair loss and the extent of baldness. 
Alopecia areata: Researchers believe that this is an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune means the body attacks itself. In this case, the body attacks its own hair. This causes smooth, round patches of hair loss on the scalp and other areas of the body. People with alopecia areata are often in excellent health. Most people see their hair re-grow. Dermatologists treat people with this disorder to help the hair re-grow more quickly.
Most people naturally shed about 50 to 100 hairs a day, but sometimes men and women can shed much more, leading to thinning hair, hair loss, and over time, baldness. The causes of this hair loss can be a result of hormones, underlying medical conditions, and even certain medications like antidepressants, high-blood pressure medications, and NSAIDS (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications). Sometimes, hair loss is purely genetic and can run in families.
There are numerous nonsurgical treatments that when combined, can offer significant hair improvements. Dr. Yaker’s TCHR Volumizing Glycolic Acid Shampoo and Conditioner help restore vitality to the hair by deep cleaning the scalp and reestablishing lost moisture content and physiological pH to the scalp and hair. Dr. Yaker has also formulated his own oral supplement, which is a blend of Aminoplex hair repair vitamins. This is made up of amino acids (building blocks of protein) that produce keratin, which makes up close to 97% of our hair. In addition, Dr. Yaker’s specially compounded FDA approved topical medication, Minoxidil (brand name: Rogaine®), is clinically proven to help slow down, stop and even reverse hair loss in women. Other nonsurgical therapies offered are Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) using the advanced LaserCap®, and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) with placenta-derived extracellular matrix therapy to help restore thinning hair. Lastly, Dr. Yaker offers scalp and facial micropigmentation where permanent ink is applied to the skin, creating micro dots that replicate the natural appearance of hair. This is used for the scalp and eyebrows.
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