My current solution is this : I have bought clip in hair extensions from Sally’s Beauty Supply store (about 100$) I actually just trim them myself and dye the hair left on my head and the extensions using an ammonia free hair dye (L’oreal or Garnier) in order for them to blend. I use a lot of root lifter and fill in the balding spots with Toppik (dark brown) and top it off with a shine spray. I’m telling you, most people have NO clue of my problem. I feel this is the best way to feel like a woman as I continue on this quest to solve my hair loss problem. I’d be happy to tell more of you about the regimine … high maintenance yes, but you know what, we all have to do what we need to do.

There’s no cure for baldness, but there are ways to hold on to what you've got. The six dermatologists and the clinical studies point to three methods: minoxidil, laser treatments, and prescription finasteride. The key is finding the combination and hair loss regimen that works for you. A doctor is your best bet for that kind of guidance — but we found a few trustworthy products that will work for most people.

I too visited the infamous-overpriced Dr Redmond from NYC. I’m on spiro and all the meds for 7 months, going on 8. Forget regrowth, forget halting of shedding, the rate of hair shedding refuses to slow. (I’m also certain its PCOS and not lupus that causing my hairloss, thoroughly medically investigated my hairloss. ) At the start of my treatment, I cut my hair to bout 5 inch lenght, so I’d easily be able to tell thinning versus halt versus regrowth. And all I can say is, I have less hair than I started with. Unfortunately even a physicians intervention is incapable of helping me. To all those out there, atleast this approach before scratching it off your list, its the least you can do.
I would just like to spare anyone else In Los Angeles thinking about going to see the dermatologist who supposedly specializes in hair lossat UCLA (Dr Strick or something like that I think is his name) He is the most insensitive and uncaring Dr. I have ever met. After waiting close to 2 hours after my scheduled appt to see him. He gave me some xeroxed copy of an article on T E that was out of Glamour or Cosmopolitan or some Fashion magazine like that. He asked no questions. I wasnt even there for 10minutes but when I showed him a big bag of hair which I saved, that had fallen out in the past several weeks. He just very insensitively told me it was T E and it would grow back-basically like just get over it, then he gave me the bums rush out the door.

i’ve come across this site before, but today has been an already 5 hour session reading everything that has been posted and researching things on the side. first and foremost, i want to thank you all for your words, rants, and honesty. i stayed home from work today after breaking down in the bathroom, already dressed for work, because of my hair. a few posts made me cry, a few made me smile and all remind me that i am not alone. i, like a few of you, hate that i focus on my hair, but even though i try my damndest to not do so, it really does depress me. i know i will bounce out of it, but it’s only a matter of time before it comes back. today is the first day that i have ever not gone in to work because of the hair situation. here’s my story:


There’s no cure for baldness, but there are ways to hold on to what you've got. The six dermatologists and the clinical studies point to three methods: minoxidil, laser treatments, and prescription finasteride. The key is finding the combination and hair loss regimen that works for you. A doctor is your best bet for that kind of guidance — but we found a few trustworthy products that will work for most people.
One of the first research studies linking alopecia with celiac disease was published in 1995. Italian doctors had noticed that several of their patients with alopecia also had celiac disease and that in one of these patients—a 14-year-old boy—the missing hair on his scalp and body completely regrew after he adopted a gluten-free diet. This boy's case and a few others prompted the doctors to screen a large group of alopecia patients for celiac disease.
Taking hair supplements can be helpful for anyone who is experiencing hair loss or hair thinning. Dendy Engelman, MD, a board-certified dermatologic surgeon at Medical Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery in New York City, previously recommended Nutrafol, a research-backed hair supplement, to Prevention. "This uses highly concentrated botanicals to address every stage of the growth cycle," she says. Nutrafol's hair supplements include vitamin E and ashwagandha (an adaptogen that helps balance cortisol levels in the body), among others.
Ironically, taking the hormone levothyroxine to treat an underactive thyroid can contribute to some hair loss, among other side effects, but this seems to be more common within the first month of treatment and more often in children than adults. This hair loss is only temporary and will go away as treatment is continued and thyroid hormone levels stabilize.
Several types of hair shaft abnormalities can lead to hair loss. These conditions cause strands of hair to thin and weaken, making them vulnerable to breaking. The hair loss doesn’t occur in the follicle but as a result of a break somewhere along the hair shaft, which is the visible part of a hair strand. This can result in overall thinning, as well as in many small, brittle hairs.
Men may also experience some sexual and emotional side effects while taking it: In a study published in the June 2011 issue of The Journal of Sexual Medicine, Dr. Michael Irwig of George Washington University found as many as 92 percent of test subjects reporting problems in the bedroom. The study also reported that “the mean duration of finasteride use was 28 months and the mean duration of persistent sexual side effects was 40 months,” meaning that side effects lingered long after subjects stopped taking the pill.
^ Martinez-Mir A, Zlotogorski A, Gordon D, Petukhova L, Mo J, Gilliam TC, Londono D, Haynes C, Ott J, Hordinsky M, Nanova K, Norris D, Price V, Duvic M, Christiano AM (February 2007). "Genomewide scan for linkage reveals evidence of several susceptibility loci for alopecia areata". American Journal of Human Genetics. 80 (2): 316–28. doi:10.1086/511442. PMC 1785354. PMID 17236136.
The only nonchemical option offered up by the dermatologists I spoke with — short of a surgical hair transplant or platelet-rich plasma therapy, which is like Kim Kardashian’s vampire facial but for your scalp — was the laser comb. First cleared by the FDA in 2009, the HairMax LaserComb is a handheld laser device that is designed to promote hair growth. As the manufacturer explains in a letter to the FDA, “The device provides distributed laser light to the scalp while the comb teeth simultaneously part the user’s hair to ensure the laser light reaches the user’s scalp,” which, in turn, stimulates the hair follicles.
According to the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery, since 2004, the number of female surgical hair restoration patients worldwide increased 24 percent. Modern surgical hair restoration procedures such as Follicular Unit Transplantation (FUT) and Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) allow surgeons to take hair from the back of the head (genetically permanent hair zone) and transplant it to the areas where balding has occurred. The reason why the hair does not fall out once transplanted in its new location is because those hair follicles take on the same characteristics as the hair in the area where it originated, the genetically permanent zone. Both approaches result in lasting outcomes. In order to know if you are a candidate, Dr. Yaker will go over your medical history and examine your hair and scalp. He will determine if you have ample, good quality hair in the permanent hair zone in order to be able to relocate those hair follicles to the areas of hair loss.

Well, after breaking down and crying in the beauty salon today I came home to try to find why my hair is falling out so rapidly. I am currently seeing an endocrinologist in Houston for hypothyroidism and he wants to put me on Aldactone (Spiro) but I tried it for one week and got dizzy and am afraid to try it again. I am also fearful to get on medication and have to live on it the rest of my life. From what I’ve read, once you get on something and stop you lose the hair all over again. Has anyone ever been on Aldactone (Spiro), regained hair and got off with no problems? Does anyone know of anyone in the Houston area that treats hair loss? I’m almost certain mine is due to thyroid issues as I can’t seem to get stabilized but I’ve been shedding for almost a year and now it’s falling out in handfuls. My hair dresser, shampooer and the rest of the salon staff tried to comfort me today but I filled their sink with hair when they washed it. I don’t know what to do! I’ve been to 2 dermatologist who suggest Rogaine, this endocrinologist who suggests Aldactone…what to do? Anyone have any ideas? Thanks!


Consider consultation with a dermatologist who has an interest in hair loss disorders. They can, admittedly, be difficult to find. Looks like you are about 3 hours away from a noted hair loss expert, Dr. Elise Olsen at Duke University. If it is very important to you, it may be worthwhile for you to travel. Hair loss cannot be appropriately diagnosed without a face-to-face consultation.
If you’re a lady and can remember the one difference in directions (or just scope out the instructions online) we recommend saving the cash. Similarly, you could go generic with Equate Hair Regrowth Treatment for Men or Costco’s Kirkland Signature Hair Regrowth Treatment Minoxidil Foam for Men. These alternatives offer the same percentage of active minoxidil and near-identical inactive ingredients for as little as half the price — a great option for both genders.
That said, there are products that don’t have FDA approval or clearance, but may help prevent hair loss. For example, shampoos with ketoconazole, a chemical with anti-DHT properties, is widely used to treat fungal infections but has become popular among consumers as a hair loss treatment. It makes sense — research shows that ketoconazole actually has beneficial effects on hair growth (especially for those with seborrheic dermatitis).
The characteristic finding of alopecia areata is one or more well-circumscribed areas of otherwise normal, hairless skin in hair-bearing areas. Occasionally, it may be necessary to biopsy the scalp to confirm the diagnosis. Other findings that may be helpful are the appearance of short hairs that presumably represent fractured hairs, short thin hairs, and gray hair growing in a bald area. Other causes of hair loss are generally excluded from the consideration by history and clinical evaluation. 

i also have learned that most people are low in their vitamin d levels, which may also contribute to hair loss. i actually had labs done to check for my vitamin d level, by a cardiologist. my heart is fine, thankfully, but she did tell me to take 2000i.u. daily of vitamin d3, specifically. when i researched about it, i found the possible hair connection. so i do take that daily. i will also be buying vitamin b6 and 12 and biotin. and i will research the gut connection because biologically speaking, it makes sense. i will return with another post in a few months and update.
Low-level laser light brushes, combs and other devices which are FDA-cleared for both men and women are available without a prescription. Although it’s not clear how the devices work, it’s thought to “stimulate the hair follicles’ energy cells to be more active,” Francis said. They’re also foolproof, telling you when and how far to move the device and they even automatically shut off.

When healthy hair is pulled out, at most a few should come out, and ripped hair should not be distributed evenly across the tugged portion of the scalp. In cases of alopecia areata, hair will tend to pull out more easily along the edge of the patch where the follicles are already being attacked by the body's immune system than away from the patch where they are still healthy.[11]
Blow dryers, flat irons, and other devices: Frequent use of a blow dryer tends to damage hair. The high heat from a blow dryer can boil the water in the hair shaft leaving the hair brittle and prone to breakage. Dermatologists recommend that you allow your hair to air dry. Then style your hair when it is dry. Dermatologists also recommend limiting the use of flat irons (these straighten hair by using high heat) and curling irons.
With those pinned down, it wasn’t hard to determine which don’t actually work. Pretty much all the “active” ingredients listed in ineffective treatments — from biotin and zinc to emu oil and saw palmetto — have never been proven, and are instead marketed based on logical-seeming correlations. It would make sense that biotin, a B vitamin readily found in hair, skin, and nails, could help hair grow more quickly. And caffeine is a stimulant that works in coffee, so rubbing some on your scalp might wake some of those sleepy follicles… right?
"The majority of men lose their hair not through stress, or bad diet, or lack of sleep, but through the genetic trait of male pattern baldness which is hard to treat through shampoos or supplements alone. Women lose their hair for very different reasons, but the argument still stands that a lot of the hair loss products on the market are just offering false hope. That said, there are a few that really work."
I recently noticed I was loosing hair on the front of my head, I started using the rogain Foam and after a month my hair started falling out even more. It’s gotten really bad, I can see my entire scalp now and my hair is falling out in chunks. Rogain advised you loose hair making room for new ones to grow, has anyone had any experience using rogain? Is This normal?
Hi Celest, My name is Sheena. I’m from a town right past Sugarland. I need to see an endocrinologist, as well, then because my dermatologist has changed my medicine three times, and my hair falls out in huge amounts every day. He diagnosed me with androgenetic alopecia, even though I told him SEVERAL times no one in my family on either side is bald or going bald. If you find a good endocrinologist, please share the name with me. Thank you
Jimenez, J. J., Wikramanayake, T. C., Bergfeld, W., Hordinsky, M., Hickman, J. G., Hamblin, M. R., & Schachner, L. A. (2014). Efficacy and Safety of a Low-level Laser Device in the Treatment of Male and Female Pattern Hair Loss: A Multicenter, Randomized, Sham Device-controlled, Double-blind Study. American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 15(2), 115–127.
Alopecia areata: Researchers believe that this is an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune means the body attacks itself. In this case, the body attacks its own hair. This causes smooth, round patches of hair loss on the scalp and other areas of the body. People with alopecia areata are often in excellent health. Most people see their hair re-grow. Dermatologists treat people with this disorder to help the hair re-grow more quickly.
In 2010, a genome-wide association study was completed that identified 129 single nucleotide polymorphisms that were associated with alopecia areata. The genes that were identified include those involved in controlling the activation and proliferation of regulatory T cells, cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, interleukin-2, interleukin-2 receptor A, and Eos (also known as Ikaros family zinc finger 4), as well as the human leukocyte antigen. The study also identified two genes, PRDX5 and STX17, that are expressed in the hair follicle.[18]
I stumbled on this website accidentally and am amazed at all your stories. I think it’s so wonderful that you all support each other in this way. I’m so sorry that you’re all missing your beautiful hair that you previously had. I am 51 and don’t really know what it would be like to have beautiful hair. I’ve always had what my mother calls “Peter Pan” hair. It never grew up. When I was three years old, I finally started to grow some hair. It got to be the way some other very young childrens’ hair was–very soft, thin, and fine. There just wasn’t a whole lot of it to begin with. You could easily see my scalp in a lot of places on my head. Well, over the course of the next 48 years, the only change in my hair is that I’ve been steadily losing what little there was to start with. I’ve never been able to put it in a pony tail or pig tails because it looked ridiculous and the scrunchy or rubber bands wouldn’t stay in anyway. There just wasn’t enough hair. I’d have to twist the rubber bands around like 20 times to try to get them to stay in–unsuccessfully. I started to notice the diffuse thinning around the age of 30. Now, at 51, people are always asking me if I’m on chemo. I’ve seen a doctor for the depression and anxiety after my separation from my husband 10 years ago and the resulting loss of my 7-year old son, but not for the loss of my hair as I thought (and was told by my internist) that nothing could be done for me. I was very ill with the depression for years, and even now can only work PRN at my hospital; but on the days I’m not working, I don’t leave the house, I don’t eat, I don’t even get out of bed. I don’t think my hair loss is due to the Effexor XR that I take for the depression, but I’m wondering if it could be from the poor nutrition and the fact that I take no supplemental vitamins. Should I go to a doctor even at this late date? The thinning has gotten so severe on my temples, crown, and above my ears that I wonder if improved nutrition would even help. What kind of doctor would I see even if I thought it would help? I’m very embarrassed by the way I look, and very lonely since I can’t date because men want nothing to do with me and most women seem embarrassed to be seen with me. I’ve tried to live a happy life despite the way I look, but I think it would be wonderful if there were actually some way I could be helped to look like a normal woman. Does anyone have any advice? Thank you for taking the time.
Central centrifugal cicatricial (scarring) alopecia: This type of hair loss occurs most often in women of African descent. It begins in the center of the scalp. As it progresses, the hair loss radiates out from the center of the scalp. The affected scalp becomes smooth and shiny. The hair loss can be very slow or rapid. When hair loss occurs quickly, the person may have tingling, burning, pain, or itching on the scalp. Treatment may help the hair re-grow if scarring has not occurred.
Its been 1.5 years since my problem started. I noticed first the texture became course or wiry. Then I wore a hair net and hard hat for 8 years I don’t know if that helped with my condition or not. Then I went to got my hair highlighted within 1 week my hair broke off to 1/2″ just in front the rest was full. Since then I have tried all kinds of hair therapy. The texture changed to being normal but I have Nice shiny almost bald spot on my head. Nothing I tried helped in regrowth. Went over all my mess with my doctor she said no should damage my hair. Also it grows but as soon as it starts looking decent I have breakage. What to do what to do.
Brushing your hair every morning about 30 mins and evening about the same duration of time with rounded tip hair-brush, will do recondition your scalp with better blood circulations. Do not use comb, it will damage your scalp. Also take hair supplements/vitamins. Believeth or not, ladies still flirting on me, even-though I’m in my mid 40s with lots of hair. 🙂
Even though modern folklore, and even some limited scientific studies, have suggested that the mother's side of the family is largely responsible for a genetic predisposition toward baldness, the truth is balding is not all our mothers' fault. In fact, doctors now say baldness patterns are inherited from a combination of many genes on both sides of the family. There are some environmental factors that come into play, too.

Just happened to find this website and have spent 3 hrs getting to know the trials us women go through with or without our hair. I have cried with you, laughed with you and felt your pain. I have frontal fibrosing alopecia and have gone to Stanford Medical Center and saw a dermatologist. I have been using clobetasol 0.05% topical solution on my hair line and sides every night and morning as well as take finasteride 2.5mg daily. Not sure if it is doing anything and what falls out will never grow back with scaring alopecia. If it gets to the point where I can’t hide it anymore I will get a real hair wig. The main thing is how beautiful each and every one of you are! The light you shine towards others makes you beautiful and makes us feel beautiful! Being thankful for what we do have always lifts the spirit and our outward appearance.


Conclusion? EAT MORE SEA SALT. DO NOT use table salt…ever. Low-salt and table salt diets contribute to heart attacks, diabetes, polycystic ovaries and obesity. They also promote toxicity and makes your body have an acidic pH, which is not good. That means gatorade is NOT replenishing. It’s better to take a dash of sea salt with water before and/or after exercising.
A hair growth cycle consists of three phases. During the anagen phase, hair grows actively. This phase may last for years. During the catagen phase, hair stops growing and separates from its follicle, which is the structure beneath the skin that holds the hair in place. The catagen phase lasts about 10 days. During the telogen phase, the follicle rests for two or three months, and then the hair falls out. The next anagen phase begins as a new hair grows in the same follicle. Most people lose 50 to 100 hairs per day as part of this natural cycle.
One hard truth: Hair loss is mostly out of your control. “Baldness comes down to your genes,” says Frederick Joyce, M.D., founder of Rejuvenate! Med Spa and a member of the International Society for Hair Restoration Surgery. “If you have the baldness gene, there are some natural remedies that may make your hair stronger and healthier to slow your hair loss slightly—but they won’t prevent you from going bald. Still, maintaining hair health by eating well and using the right products—combined with medical-grade treatments—can really work all together to help you have a fuller, thicker head of hair.”
What’s important to know: the cause of hair loss is specific to each individual, which is why it is so important to have a board-certified dermatologist examine, diagnose, and treat your condition. DR.DENNIS GROSS will review your symptoms, examine your scalp, perform a possible scalp biopsy, and/or order medical and blood tests if an underlying medical condition (like thyroid disease, diabetes, or autoimmune diseases like lupus) is suspected.
I’m 55.. gee, had to count with my fingers, lol~ but since I had started puberty I started losing my hair. I managed through the difficult years of Junior High and High school (2 college yrs) by having perms done. The many different ways of trying to cover it. At 14 being told its male hair baldness was pretty much saying nothing you can do. All my life I stayed away during the day time, or with hats, I even worked nights. Tried many items, then later in life diagnosed with PCOS, which makes sense, why would a young girl just starting puberty start going bald. My siblings had too much hair, my sister looked like Bernadette Peters, with twice the hair. About 4 yrs ago a life long friend, called me at 2 am, said turn on HSN, I did, and it was a color fill in~we both purchased it and I absolutely love it! I look normal enough to walk past you, just don’t stare too long, lol, its called Truhair by Ashley Scott. Cant be without it. I use the Rogaine womans 5%, this helps my hair from keep falling, use it every night before bed, I take 5000 vitamin d and 10,000 biotin~ I wish I had these items back when I was teenager, would have saved me decades of embarrassment and heartache. My bald spot/thinning spot looked like a monks cap. I feel the best I have in many, many years. My 23 yrs. daughter had 3.7 ovarian cancer, spread everywhere and she survived, but now..after her 5 yrs remission, she started losing her hair. I feel so horrible for her. I know its from chemo and she ended up having a full hysterectomy, and I’m trying to get her to see a Endorinologist, as I’m sure with hers its her hormones. I finally also gave this affliction to our Lord and the thinning has decreased significantly ! I’m going to keep praying! and also praying for a cure ! the torment of losing your hair is real and devastating.

Certain medical issues can also impair hair growth. An overactive or underactive thyroid gland can cause hair loss. So can iron deficiency. When women go through menopause and their estrogen levels fall, their hair often begins to thin. Many women also lose some hair a few months after giving birth because of the hormonal changes the body experiences.
I want to say that all of you are very courageous and sharing. I appreciate everything I have read here. Thankfully, I am starting out in a slightly better position – I still have a fair amount of hair left. I started with a HUGE amount of hair. For the last 6 – 12 months, I have been losing handfulls of hair in the shower every morning, then some more when I comb it out, then a bit more when I put styling product in it, then just a bit more during the day. The shower is the huge hit, though. I’m 37 and on a ton of medication – synthroid, neurontin (an amitryptiline derivative), anti-depressants, and a host of pain medications for a degenerative back problem. I brought my hair loss up to a doc around the time it started, since I was already on synthroid, he re-tested my levels, and said everything was fine. My hair structure has always been on the thin side, but there was just so damn much it didn’t matter – now there is a lot less. What used to take upwards of 20 minutes to dry with a dryer, now takes 5. I’ve been worried about it for quite a while, and didn’t know what to do. I started my on-line research today with hair extensions and stumbled on this site. I am encouraged that I’m starting my search for an answer relatively early in my hair loss journey. I have some great advice and questions to go in to see my doc about. If anyone has any recommendations for the Boise, ID area for a dermatologist and endocrinologist, I would really appreciate it.
I would like to encourage you to join the Network if you have not already. There are so many wonderful women in this beloved Network that would love to hear your stories. The emotional toll that hair loss can have on women can be devestating and knowing that we are not alone helps to set us on a firmer foundation as we walk this journey called “hairloss.”
In answer to which doctor should I see for my hair loss, my opinion is that you should probably see both. Most doctors don’t know enough about hair loss as it is, so seeing doctors in different specialties may actually help you get a better, more accurate diagnosis. I am sure there are various conditions of hair loss that might be better served by seeing one more than the other. Perhaps a dermatologist would be better suited in determining if the cause was an infectious skin condition such as ringworm or scaring alopecia, and an endocrinologist may be better at diagnosing hormone related hair loss. The truth is, any doctor whether it is an endocrinologist, dermatologist, or general practitioner with a strong interest and knowledge in hair loss can make a proper diagnosis and work with you on the the treatment they think will produce the best results. The operative words here are “interest and knowledge.”
Hello everyone. I am a 14 yr old girl that is loosing my hair. I know that may seem young, but I knew it was coming. My father and I have the same hair and it runs in his family to have hair loss at an early age. I have been loosing my hair since I was ten. It hasn’t been chunks, but if you add the hair together, that is alot of hair loss. So I was wondering if anyone had any information they could help me out with, other than seeing a doctor. My mom is taking me, even though we don’t know what to expect. I mean, this is genetic so I’m praying there is a cure somehow to either stop my hair from falling or adding hair on my head. Please help! If anyone has any advice please let me know immediately. I thank you for your time.
I’m 55.. gee, had to count with my fingers, lol~ but since I had started puberty I started losing my hair. I managed through the difficult years of Junior High and High school (2 college yrs) by having perms done. The many different ways of trying to cover it. At 14 being told its male hair baldness was pretty much saying nothing you can do. All my life I stayed away during the day time, or with hats, I even worked nights. Tried many items, then later in life diagnosed with PCOS, which makes sense, why would a young girl just starting puberty start going bald. My siblings had too much hair, my sister looked like Bernadette Peters, with twice the hair. About 4 yrs ago a life long friend, called me at 2 am, said turn on HSN, I did, and it was a color fill in~we both purchased it and I absolutely love it! I look normal enough to walk past you, just don’t stare too long, lol, its called Truhair by Ashley Scott. Cant be without it. I use the Rogaine womans 5%, this helps my hair from keep falling, use it every night before bed, I take 5000 vitamin d and 10,000 biotin~ I wish I had these items back when I was teenager, would have saved me decades of embarrassment and heartache. My bald spot/thinning spot looked like a monks cap. I feel the best I have in many, many years. My 23 yrs. daughter had 3.7 ovarian cancer, spread everywhere and she survived, but now..after her 5 yrs remission, she started losing her hair. I feel so horrible for her. I know its from chemo and she ended up having a full hysterectomy, and I’m trying to get her to see a Endorinologist, as I’m sure with hers its her hormones. I finally also gave this affliction to our Lord and the thinning has decreased significantly ! I’m going to keep praying! and also praying for a cure ! the torment of losing your hair is real and devastating.
I stumbled on this website accidentally and am amazed at all your stories. I think it’s so wonderful that you all support each other in this way. I’m so sorry that you’re all missing your beautiful hair that you previously had. I am 51 and don’t really know what it would be like to have beautiful hair. I’ve always had what my mother calls “Peter Pan” hair. It never grew up. When I was three years old, I finally started to grow some hair. It got to be the way some other very young childrens’ hair was–very soft, thin, and fine. There just wasn’t a whole lot of it to begin with. You could easily see my scalp in a lot of places on my head. Well, over the course of the next 48 years, the only change in my hair is that I’ve been steadily losing what little there was to start with. I’ve never been able to put it in a pony tail or pig tails because it looked ridiculous and the scrunchy or rubber bands wouldn’t stay in anyway. There just wasn’t enough hair. I’d have to twist the rubber bands around like 20 times to try to get them to stay in–unsuccessfully. I started to notice the diffuse thinning around the age of 30. Now, at 51, people are always asking me if I’m on chemo. I’ve seen a doctor for the depression and anxiety after my separation from my husband 10 years ago and the resulting loss of my 7-year old son, but not for the loss of my hair as I thought (and was told by my internist) that nothing could be done for me. I was very ill with the depression for years, and even now can only work PRN at my hospital; but on the days I’m not working, I don’t leave the house, I don’t eat, I don’t even get out of bed. I don’t think my hair loss is due to the Effexor XR that I take for the depression, but I’m wondering if it could be from the poor nutrition and the fact that I take no supplemental vitamins. Should I go to a doctor even at this late date? The thinning has gotten so severe on my temples, crown, and above my ears that I wonder if improved nutrition would even help. What kind of doctor would I see even if I thought it would help? I’m very embarrassed by the way I look, and very lonely since I can’t date because men want nothing to do with me and most women seem embarrassed to be seen with me. I’ve tried to live a happy life despite the way I look, but I think it would be wonderful if there were actually some way I could be helped to look like a normal woman. Does anyone have any advice? Thank you for taking the time.
Thank you for all your post. My daughter had extremely thick hair about eight years ago. It was so thick you could barely put it in a scrunchie. Her hair has been continuously thinning to the point that you can see through it. All the women in my family on both sides have extremely thick hair. We live in the north east and have seen several GP and a Dermatologist who act like there is nothing wrong. I work in the medical field and when I hear this I get so mad because I feel like they want to just brush of like no big deal. It is a big deal to all women no matter what ages. I have written done some of the post advise and will continue to look for an endocrinologist for her. Please keep me postes on any new developements.
If a pregnant woman comes in contact with crushed or broken Finasteride tablets, wash the contact area right away with soap and water. If a woman who is pregnant comes into contact with the active ingredient in Finasteride, a healthcare provider should be consulted. If a woman who is pregnant with a male baby swallows or comes in contact with the medicine in Finasteride, the male baby may be born with sex organs that are not normal.
The Rogaine rep we spoke to explained that the different packaging (and therefore different prices) has to do with the FDA-approval process: “We discovered in clinical trials that the hair loss patterns between men and women are different,” she said by way of explanation. “Men typically have that bald spot on the crown of their head, where women generally have a general thinning throughout, but concentrated more on the top of the head. So for FDA approval, we had to come up with two different, gender-specific products, so the directions were more explanatory.” 

^ Martinez-Mir A, Zlotogorski A, Gordon D, Petukhova L, Mo J, Gilliam TC, Londono D, Haynes C, Ott J, Hordinsky M, Nanova K, Norris D, Price V, Duvic M, Christiano AM (February 2007). "Genomewide scan for linkage reveals evidence of several susceptibility loci for alopecia areata". American Journal of Human Genetics. 80 (2): 316–28. doi:10.1086/511442. PMC 1785354. PMID 17236136.
Thank you Diana. If you find out any more information, I would appreciate it. I have a dermatologist across the street from the Skin and Cancer Institute. I’m still not sure who to start with, the dermatologist or an endocronologist. I left a message for my PCP today to see if she is comfortable working with female hair loss or if not if she could refer me to someone who specializes in it. I will let you know what I hear back. In the meantime, thanks for your support. Take care.
Because of its psychologic nature, the mainstays of treatment are counseling, behavior modification techniques, and hypnosis. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and other medications for depression or obsessive-compulsive disorder may be used in some cases, although no medications are FDA-approved for treatment of trichotillomania.17 If a more moth-eaten appearance of hair loss is present and no evidence of hair-pulling behavior can be elicited, syphilis should be suspected.
There are numerous nonsurgical treatments that when combined, can offer significant hair improvements. Dr. Yaker’s TCHR Volumizing Glycolic Acid Shampoo and Conditioner help restore vitality to the hair by deep cleaning the scalp and reestablishing lost moisture content and physiological pH to the scalp and hair. Dr. Yaker has also formulated his own oral supplement, which is a blend of Aminoplex hair repair vitamins. This is made up of amino acids (building blocks of protein) that produce keratin, which makes up close to 97% of our hair. In addition, Dr. Yaker’s specially compounded FDA approved topical medication, Minoxidil (brand name: Rogaine®), is clinically proven to help slow down, stop and even reverse hair loss in women. Other nonsurgical therapies offered are Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) using the advanced LaserCap®, and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) with placenta-derived extracellular matrix therapy to help restore thinning hair. Lastly, Dr. Yaker offers scalp and facial micropigmentation where permanent ink is applied to the skin, creating micro dots that replicate the natural appearance of hair. This is used for the scalp and eyebrows.
my daughter is 19 and has been diagnosed with androgenetic alopecia. She has been to several dermatologists. They don’t understand the problem. I am planning to bring her to Dr. Geoffrey Redmond. I read his website. He surely knows how to treat this kind of hair loss. I spoke to his receptionist… they are very accomodating and profesional. So, as much as I would like to believe, that Dr. Redmond will be able to fix this altogether, I do understand he is not a miracle worker. But, I do believe, if anyone can understand this
If you’re a gentleman who’s been noticing a receding hairline or is worried about balding, the first step is to schedule a visit with a doctor or dermatologist and make sure your hair loss isn’t a sign of a more serious health issue. “Not all hair loss is male-pattern hair loss,” explains Dr. Marc Glashofer, a board-certified dermatologist specializing in hair loss and practicing in northern New Jersey. A thyroid disorder, an autoimmune disease, or even a scalp issue could be making you look like Bruce Willis in Die Hard 2. But most hair loss is androgenetic alopecia, also known as male-pattern baldness, and fortunately (or not, depending on your perspective), it’s just a symptom of getting older.
I got really sick at the age 40, 2 years after my second child was born,I started losing weight,I went from 54kg down to 47kg,my skin was splitting on the backs of my legs,both my hands,I had blisters up my arms ,on the tops of my feet,migraines that would have me vomiting none stop for ten hours,then only to sleep for 2 days to recover,no doctors were interested,I saw 8 and they all wanted me on anxiety medication because I was going through a break up that was there answer to the way I was feeling.No one wanted to listen to me.Almost feeling like
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