Rogaine’s foam squirts out just like hair mousse and is applied with “cool, dry hands.” Applying means working the foam down to the scalp where you want to see thicker growth — for it to work, “it has to get into your scalp,” Dr. Wolfeld explains. “If it sits on your hair, it’s not really as effective.” Once massaged, it dissolves into a watery liquid that leaves a tingly sensation, “but no burning!” one of our balding testers was happy to discover.
The best fix by far for replacing lost hair is a transplant. Back in the day, docs used plugs that resembled cornrows (definitely not natural looking). Today, guys have more options. You can go for “the strip method” where a doctor surgically removes a strip of hair from the back of your head, dissects every hair graft under a microscope, and then plants the individual grafts onto hair-thin areas of your scalp with tiny incisions.

I am 43 and I have been thinning/losing my hair for the past four years. It is so upsetting. I know very few people who can relate…until I came across this site. Has anyone tried apple cider vinegar? I read that it can help with hair loss, but I am skeptical, as all of the remedies I’ve tried thus far have been disappointing. I try to put my hair loss situation in perspective, but I’m not always successful. Best wishes to all of the women on this site. I hope hair restoration is around the corner for all of us.
I had a hair transplant by Dr. Michael Lorin Reed’s STAFF in NYC 14 months and $7,000 ago! It has not worked. I am back to the same state of hair loss as before I did this. I asked why he didn’t do any blood tests, and he said that it wasn’t necessary. I had repeatedly asked if the procedure works on everyone, to which he said “YES” . I have been so upset that I haven’t yet gone to see him. Has anyone else had any kind of experience with this guy?
In-office laser light treatments or at-home handheld devices, such as the HairMax LaserComb, supposedly grow new hair by stimulating blood flow to the area (think: an amped-up version of a scalp-stimulating shampoo). Just don’t expect the device to make your noggin go from looking like George Costanza’s to Jerry Seinfeld’s. “These lasers won’t grow any new hair. If anything, they may just help you hang on to some of the hair that you already have a bit longer,” says Dr. Joyce.
Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease, where a person's immune system attacks the body, in this case, the hair follicles. When this happens, the person's hair begins to fall out, often in clumps the size and shape of a quarter. The extent of the hair loss varies; in some cases, it is only in a few spots. In others, the hair loss can be greater. On rare occasions, the person loses all of the hair on his or her head (alopecia areata totalis) or entire body (alopecia areata universalis).
Duke’s dermatologists diagnose and treat hair disorders, such as hair loss (alopecia), excessive hairiness (hirsutism), and abnormal hair growth (hypertrichosis). We understand that abnormal hair growth can be distressing and affect your self confidence. We work closely with you to diagnose the cause of your condition, and develop a personalized treatment plan that meets your medical needs, improves your condition, and helps you regain a positive self-image.
I’m dieing I needed someone to listen to me.I ended up leaving my home town to see an endroconologist in the city yep I had Hasimotos thyrioditis which wasn’t just one symptom I had them all serve fatigue,bad skin,nails,hair,my digestive system wasn’t working properly,that was a major shut down to my body coming from someone who always was fit and look after my body.got me on medication and away I go but wasn’t that easy,I was really sick ,my medication was being prescribed by my doctor but over medicating me ,I didn’t no much and kept returning to my doctor always feeling unwell to look after my small children being a single mum all on my own with no family and friends to help. Sick of feeling like this back to my endo for more test sick of the pain that was starting in my scalp and hair loss bad,I went of my medication because I felt better of it,well that was the biggest mistake ,he said my body would have gone into thyriod storm and would end up in ICU,and not to ever do that again.Well 8 years on the pain in my scalp s still bad, iv seen specialist about my hair told me I had alepecia 8 injection in my scalp,and what a painful night.I have hair shedding for the last 4 years and I cry a lot from the pain and the lose of hair .I have very long hair and when I plait it it’s the thickness of two pencils,bbbbbuuuuttt my doctor says there is nothing wrong with my hair,I feel like punching her. I have spent years reading books,and articles trying to fix myself but still nothing,I have seen naturopaths, physiotherapist ,psychologist to talk about the pain in my head and feeling sick all a time ,it’s like we’re do you go.So ladies in all the articles Iv read I still have no help with my hair and it seems lots out there like me.looks like we have to suck it up
Shedding is never fun — just ask my vacuum cleaner. It’s even less fun when you realize the golf ball size bits of hair you’re tugging out of the roller came from your own head. Oh, the horror! As we get older (yes ladies, this is for you too) our once glorious crown of healthy hair can become brittle, or even worse, be genetically predisposed to jump ship, leaving our poor, bald heads to fend for themselves.

When healthy hair is pulled out, at most a few should come out, and ripped hair should not be distributed evenly across the tugged portion of the scalp. In cases of alopecia areata, hair will tend to pull out more easily along the edge of the patch where the follicles are already being attacked by the body's immune system than away from the patch where they are still healthy.[11]
The best fix by far for replacing lost hair is a transplant. Back in the day, docs used plugs that resembled cornrows (definitely not natural looking). Today, guys have more options. You can go for “the strip method” where a doctor surgically removes a strip of hair from the back of your head, dissects every hair graft under a microscope, and then plants the individual grafts onto hair-thin areas of your scalp with tiny incisions.
Im new here and suffer from hair loss. I’m 25 and have developed bald spots about 2 yrs ago back in 09. On the side of my head near my temple areas. I hide the bald spots with headbands every chance i have because i feel as if people just look directly there…im self concious about myself because about a year ago i had a head full of hair and now i dont..I want to seek help just doesnt know where to begin…im currently takin biotin and keep hope alive…
I’ve been to five doctors. Two of them made fun of me. Only one doctor was remotely interested in my hair loss. He prescribed propecia, mens Rogain, and told me to take 2600 ml of biotin a day. My hair is still falling out. I am almost bald. None would give me any tests to determine the cause (other than thyroid, which has been done twice). The doctors tell me it is hereditary. If they could see my family, they would know that is not true. No one that I know of in my blood line has lost their hair. I am beside myself. I barely leave the house anymore. I wish I could find some help somewhere.
Alopecia areata affects people of all ages including young children. It produces circular patches of hair loss that appear overnight. More patches appear over time and eventually about 5% of people affected lose every hair on their body. This includes eyebrows, eyelashes and even nose hairs. In some people, hair grows back, either in the same place or on a previously unaffected part of the scalp or body.
Taking hair supplements can be helpful for anyone who is experiencing hair loss or hair thinning. Dendy Engelman, MD, a board-certified dermatologic surgeon at Medical Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery in New York City, previously recommended Nutrafol, a research-backed hair supplement, to Prevention. "This uses highly concentrated botanicals to address every stage of the growth cycle," she says. Nutrafol's hair supplements include vitamin E and ashwagandha (an adaptogen that helps balance cortisol levels in the body), among others.
i’ve come across this site before, but today has been an already 5 hour session reading everything that has been posted and researching things on the side. first and foremost, i want to thank you all for your words, rants, and honesty. i stayed home from work today after breaking down in the bathroom, already dressed for work, because of my hair. a few posts made me cry, a few made me smile and all remind me that i am not alone. i, like a few of you, hate that i focus on my hair, but even though i try my damndest to not do so, it really does depress me. i know i will bounce out of it, but it’s only a matter of time before it comes back. today is the first day that i have ever not gone in to work because of the hair situation. here’s my story:
Laser light therapy is not a baldness solution, and the HairMax takes a time commitment: You have to use the product for 15 minutes a day, three days a week and you have to keep using it indefinitely to get results. Still, laser light therapy has no major side effects, and may be best for men who have noticed some increased shedding and want to maintain more of the hair they have on their head.
Dr. Curtis says genes and hormones are the leading causes of hair loss.  And it's not just something we face as we age.  She says, "I've seen patients as young as 14-15 years old start having hair loss. It's all dependent on your genetics. Unfortunately the earlier it starts, the more likely it's going to be more severe in nature and the faster it can progress."
“There’s people selling pills and creams and lotions and whatever else, and sometimes you can’t even trust what ingredients they have in there,” he warned us when we spoke to him over the phone. Key takeaway: The hair loss industry is crazy dishonest, so we eliminated any treatments (especially homeopathic methods) that aren’t based in concrete, peer-reviewed science.
I’ve been to five doctors. Two of them made fun of me. Only one doctor was remotely interested in my hair loss. He prescribed propecia, mens Rogain, and told me to take 2600 ml of biotin a day. My hair is still falling out. I am almost bald. None would give me any tests to determine the cause (other than thyroid, which has been done twice). The doctors tell me it is hereditary. If they could see my family, they would know that is not true. No one that I know of in my blood line has lost their hair. I am beside myself. I barely leave the house anymore. I wish I could find some help somewhere.
I am relieved to find out that I am not the only female going through this problem. Don’t get me wrong. I am sorry that you are all going through this, but I was beginning to think I was the only female with this problem. I am 22 years old and I have been experiencing hair loss for the last two years. At first, it didn’t really bother me and I imagined it wouldn’t last. Then, it progressively got worse and has continued for the last two years. I have seen my PCP, GYN as well as various Endocrinologists and ENT’s to try and get to the source of my hair loss. They have all laughed at me and told me not to worry about it. I feel like they’ve all blown me off because I’m so young; However, no one understands how emotionally and physically destructive this is! I used to have tons of hair! I was even named “Best Hair” my senior year in high school and now I am ashamed to go out in public or even look at myself. I have very little hair left and it’s ruining my life, my relationship with my boyfriend, and my ability to maintain other relationships. I am now suffering from a lot of anxiety, depression and low self esteem. I’m all out of ideas and hope! My mother suggested that I go see a dermatologist, but I wouldn’t even know who to trust with this issue. The last thing I need is another doctor looking at me like I’m crazy and thinking that because I’m so young I should just ignore it. I can’t ignore it! It has been going on for far too long and all I want is someone who will listen to me and try to help me. I live in Arizona. Do any of you know of a good dermatologist that I can go see? I hate that this is happening to me and the negative impact it has been having and will continue to have on my life. I’m afraid that it’s only going to get worse and I will wake up one day completely bald! If any of you have advice or suggestions, I would be glad to hear them!
Leprosy (Hansen's disease) is a disfiguring disease caused by infection with Mycobacterium leprae bacteria. The disease is spread from person to person through nasal secretions or droplets. Symptoms and signs of leprosy include numbness, loss of temperature sensation, painless ulcers, eye damage, loss of digits, and facial disfigurement. Leprosy is treated with antibiotics and the dosage and length of time of administration depends upon which form of leprosy the patient has.
First Dr.I saw was my regular dermatologist. He basically said I should “try not to stress so much” and it would grow back. My neurologist wasnt happy with that answer either so he sent me to another derm., she checked my iron and put me on Chromagen?. 6 months later, no new growth Then she said male pattern baldness, use men’s rogaine and that was it.
Starting in my very early 20s i noticed the beginnings of my hair loss and started asking doctors about it with no hope/no answers until my 27.5 year. A local dermatologist “heard” something about the spironolactone/yaz combo and was willing to try it out -along with biotin, rogaine and omegas. I believe she helped the quality of my skin and hair, but did not help the fact that my hair continued to disappear.
Dr. Williams is also the primary investigator in a National Institute of Health (NIH) approved IRB study in regenerative medical treatment procedures with stem cell/stromal therapy for hair loss in androgenetic alopecia. A new study treating scaring and autoimmune (Alopecia Areata) alopecia is expected in 2017. Dr. Williams believes the foundations of health and hair restoration are founded on prevention and wellness. His primary practice is hair restoration surgery in Orange County, and he is involved in teaching medical students and residents from various medical training programs in northern and southern California. He is on the clinical teaching faculty of Western University of Health Science in Pomona, California; and Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine in San Francisco, California, and Chapman University new Health Science teaching facilities.
In-office laser light treatments or at-home handheld devices, such as the HairMax LaserComb, supposedly grow new hair by stimulating blood flow to the area (think: an amped-up version of a scalp-stimulating shampoo). Just don’t expect the device to make your noggin go from looking like George Costanza’s to Jerry Seinfeld’s. “These lasers won’t grow any new hair. If anything, they may just help you hang on to some of the hair that you already have a bit longer,” says Dr. Joyce.
If you find yourself snacking at night before bed, it may be because you're bored or anxious — not truly hungry — and eating makes you feel better. Try eating a healthy dinner a bit later in the evening. If your stomach is truly growling before bed, try a protein-based snack like a hard-boiled egg or a slice of cheese. A few spoonfuls of yogurt or some fruit is another good option. 

I am 20 and have been losing hair since I was 17. It is such a confidence killer. I really do miss my beautiful thick and black hair. Now my hair is thin and a bit gray as well. I only think of it sometimes…but I used to be so depressed i can barely get out of bed. Whenever I am talking to someone, I always wonder if they are looking at my hair. I am currently using Rogaine for Women…it worked one summer when I was following the regimen religiously. However, I am so bad with routines, so now I try to remember to put it on my scalp morning and night. I recently also started to take Shen Min Hir Nutrients…not sure if it works yet. Does anyone have any advice? I really want to get a hair biopsy but I don’t know how. The places I called offered scalp analysis to prepare for hair transplants…which is not something that I am considering. I also saw 2 derms, one didn’t know what was wrong and only offered Rogaine as a solution, and the other said it is androgenic alopecia. I think I might have hormonal problems, but really not that sure. My scalp is always oily and so is my skin. Before my hairloss, I had really itchy scalp. Now it’s still oily but I wash it every other day. I also dye my hair to hide the gray. Sometimes I just feel so ugly and depressed in thinking about my hair. Beautiful hair is the only thing that I want back.


Most people naturally shed about 50 to 100 hairs a day, but sometimes men and women can shed much more, leading to thinning hair, hair loss, and over time, baldness. The causes of this hair loss can be a result of hormones, underlying medical conditions, and even certain medications like antidepressants, high-blood pressure medications, and NSAIDS (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications). Sometimes, hair loss is purely genetic and can run in families.


I would like to encourage you to join the Network if you have not already. There are so many wonderful women in this beloved Network that would love to hear your stories. The emotional toll that hair loss can have on women can be devestating and knowing that we are not alone helps to set us on a firmer foundation as we walk this journey called “hairloss.”

i also have learned that most people are low in their vitamin d levels, which may also contribute to hair loss. i actually had labs done to check for my vitamin d level, by a cardiologist. my heart is fine, thankfully, but she did tell me to take 2000i.u. daily of vitamin d3, specifically. when i researched about it, i found the possible hair connection. so i do take that daily. i will also be buying vitamin b6 and 12 and biotin. and i will research the gut connection because biologically speaking, it makes sense. i will return with another post in a few months and update.


Re-growing hair: It is likely that the hair will grow back even without treatment. It may fall out again, though. Most patients lose their hair more than once before the disease goes away for good. Even people who lose all the hair on their scalp and body can have their hair grow back. When hair loss is widespread (lots of hair loss on the scalp and/or body), there is a greater chance that the hair will not re-grow.
I am on Arava and my hair has become extremely coarse, frizzy, and tight tight curls in the back. The sides of my hair are pure frizz and the top is straight, with frizz. It used to be smooth and so easy to manage. Now it takes so long and it looks awful. Anyone find the same thing and anything that helps? I have tried so very many hair products, so has my beautician. She says it is like I have 3 completely different textures on my head.
Yes, absolutely. There are certain hair treatments, as well as styles, that can trigger hair loss: tight braids, pigtails, hair weaves, and cornrows can all trigger temporary hair loss called traction alopecia. Chemical relaxers; overuse of chemical colorants; hot-oil treatments; overuse of flat irons, curling irons, or even hot blow-dryers can all damage hair at the root, causing it to fall out. If you are experiencing hair loss, its best to schedule an appointment with our office so that we can help diagnose your issue and determine how best to your hair loss.
The only nonchemical option offered up by the dermatologists I spoke with — short of a surgical hair transplant or platelet-rich plasma therapy, which is like Kim Kardashian’s vampire facial but for your scalp — was the laser comb. First cleared by the FDA in 2009, the HairMax LaserComb is a handheld laser device that is designed to promote hair growth. As the manufacturer explains in a letter to the FDA, “The device provides distributed laser light to the scalp while the comb teeth simultaneously part the user’s hair to ensure the laser light reaches the user’s scalp,” which, in turn, stimulates the hair follicles.
It is perfectly normal for people to shed 50 to 100 hairs per day. This generally doesn't cause noticeable thinning of scalp hair because new hair is growing in at the same time that hair is shedding. However, hair loss occurs when this hair growth cycle and shedding is disrupted or when the hair follicle becomes destroyed and replaced with scar tissue. Female pattern hair loss (androgenetic alopecia) is the most common form of hair loss in women. This occurs gradually and is caused by genetics (from either side of the family), age, and the action of a specific male hormone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT). This hormone is found in lesser amounts in women and it preys on the hair follicles, preventing them from receiving vital nutrients for proper hair follicle growth, leading to the hairs shrinking, and resulting in a shorter lifespan. Interestingly, DHT does not need to be elevated to generate hair loss. Estrogen, when lowered as commonly seen in menopause, creates a change in the ratio of male to female hormones, giving an edge to these male hormones. Compounded with the sensitivity of DHT to the hair follicles, heredity can affect the age at which a woman begins to lose her hair, as well as the rate of hair loss and the extent of baldness. 
One of the first research studies linking alopecia with celiac disease was published in 1995. Italian doctors had noticed that several of their patients with alopecia also had celiac disease and that in one of these patients—a 14-year-old boy—the missing hair on his scalp and body completely regrew after he adopted a gluten-free diet. This boy's case and a few others prompted the doctors to screen a large group of alopecia patients for celiac disease.
Duke’s dermatologists diagnose and treat hair disorders, such as hair loss (alopecia), excessive hairiness (hirsutism), and abnormal hair growth (hypertrichosis). We understand that abnormal hair growth can be distressing and affect your self confidence. We work closely with you to diagnose the cause of your condition, and develop a personalized treatment plan that meets your medical needs, improves your condition, and helps you regain a positive self-image.
As mentioned above, an autoimmune response is commonly associated with hair loss related to alopecia areata. Patients who have this condition see their body’s immune system attack their hair follicles. The patient’s hair follicles become very small and hair growth begins to stop.  A major symptom of alopecia areata is patchy hair loss, according to the American Academy of Dermatology, which says patients often first notice the problem when they see clumps of hair on their pillow or in the shower. 

Other medical conditions — most commonly telogen effluvium and seborrheic dermatitis — can also cause hair loss, but most people can trace their follicular woes back to androgenetic alopecia, so we focused our search there. We started with more than 200 products, including all-natural solutions and high-tech gadgets, while skipping treatments that focus only on volumizing or thickening hair. We also limited our scope to the scalp, and left out specialty products designed only for eyebrows or beards.
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I wanted to say I have been to both a GYN here and a hair loss dermatogist here in Lake Mary FL, with no results, so I am still looking for another derm that knows something about hair dye allergys. I have had my hormones tested, the dr said that my estro was high, but she expected that since their is no period. I am only 45 , I used to have very thick coarse hair. Had a bad eposide of itching, then hair lost last year. I told the derm that I suspected the hair color. They did not seem intested, said that hair loss comes with age. I have now had another spell, of bad rashing. It is the hair dye. From my reseach it can have PPD, in it almost all do. Check the web for PPD allergy. As you color you can become more and more subseptable to it. My hair stylist always commented on the hair loss. I think that hormones changing can effect it also. You can become allergic to this chemical at any time. It is hard to connect the dots. Dr.’s don’t seem interested. Natualist, I tried accupunture and non homotherphy, no noticable difference.. I have tried Jason hair shampoo, not much luck with that either. BUT look for PPD/free hair colors…and test before using, that will save some hair from falling. So far I have found a Wella, Yo Colors, Reflex, Nauture Pat It usually happens a week later, not right after coloring FYI…What does work is Botin…..
Shedding is never fun — just ask my vacuum cleaner. It’s even less fun when you realize the golf ball size bits of hair you’re tugging out of the roller came from your own head. Oh, the horror! As we get older (yes ladies, this is for you too) our once glorious crown of healthy hair can become brittle, or even worse, be genetically predisposed to jump ship, leaving our poor, bald heads to fend for themselves.
Though we think our hair is super important, our bodies consider it nonessential (read: we don’t need it to stay conscious). Other bodily functions, like breathing, are more pressing and get first access to the nutrients in our diet. Our hair gets the leftovers. Protein is your hair's best friend, so reach for healthy protein such as eggs and fish and avoid fasting or yoyo dieting. These can deprive your body of these essential building blocks for a healthy scalp and hair. Wild salmon, tuna and trout are packed with omega-3 fatty acids that help provide moisture and prevent dry and brittle hair. Foods rich in B vitamins also help keep hair follicles healthy, decreasing the risk for hair loss. Fruits and vegetables, and beans and lean meat sources, such as chicken or turkey breast, are all great sources for vitamin B.
Ms. Imhof, who lives in Land O’Lakes, Fla., was skeptical. The company’s before and after photos seemed too good to be true. But she went for a consultation and made the cut. (Harklinikken’s products are not available to anyone with autoimmune illnesses like alopecia or baldness from scarring, or anyone who is unlikely to see at least a 30 percent increase in growth.)
“There’s people selling pills and creams and lotions and whatever else, and sometimes you can’t even trust what ingredients they have in there,” he warned us when we spoke to him over the phone. Key takeaway: The hair loss industry is crazy dishonest, so we eliminated any treatments (especially homeopathic methods) that aren’t based in concrete, peer-reviewed science.

Diffuse female hair thinning and hair loss during premenopausal age is usually not heredity. It is usually caused by hormonal imbalances seeing in PCOS or thyroid disorder, nutritional deficiency (low iron), and stress. Women with PCOS produce high levels of androgens such as testosterones and DHEAS. The ratio of LH and FSH is also more than 2. Make sure you get your sex hormones check if you notice your hair thinning.
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