As mentioned above, an autoimmune response is commonly associated with hair loss related to alopecia areata. Patients who have this condition see their body’s immune system attack their hair follicles. The patient’s hair follicles become very small and hair growth begins to stop.  A major symptom of alopecia areata is patchy hair loss, according to the American Academy of Dermatology, which says patients often first notice the problem when they see clumps of hair on their pillow or in the shower.
Dr. Schweiger Dermatologist NYC Bernstein Medical – no actual diagnostic dermatology, just the most disinterested sales pitch for FUT. All the tests and diagnostic work they list on the site as part of the consult is garbage. I gave him my recent CBC which showed hematology problems, he didn’t even look at it. He magnified a tiny area of my scalp for 20 seconds and said it was normal, I have scabs! Said I probably suffered from hormonal imbalance and my hair would grow back and kept blaming it on hair extensions that I haven’t worn in a long time. His prognosis, a $9,000 FUT. I paid $325 for the visit. He was truly going through the motions even his assistant looked embarrassed!
One more disease that causes hair loss is male pattern baldness. About two out of three men, experience hair loss by their age of 60 and most of the time, the hair loss is because of male pattern baldness. Such type of hair loss, caused by a combo of genes and male sex hormones, usually follow a classic pattern where the hair recedes at the temples, thus leaving an M-shaped hairline.
According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, autoimmune diseases occur when your immune system, which is your body’s method of protecting you from disease, turns against itself and attacks healthy cells in your body. It’s not clear what causes any autoimmune diseases. There is evidence that they tend to run in families. And it’s also known that women, particularly African-American, Hispanic-American, and Native-American women, are more prone to getting them.
There are many potential causes of hair loss in women , including medical conditions, medications, and physical or emotional stress. If you notice unusual hair loss of any kind, it's important to see your primary care provider or a dermatologist, to determine the cause and appropriate treatment. You may also want to ask your clinician for a referral to a therapist or support group to address emotional difficulties. Hair loss in women can be frustrating, but recent years have seen an increase in resources for coping with the problem.
Diphencyprone (DPCP): This medicine is applied to the bald skin. It causes a small allergic reaction. When the reaction occurs, a patient has redness, swelling, and itching. Dermatologists believe this allergic reaction tricks the immune system, causing it to send white blood cells to the surface of the scalp. This fights the inflammation. It also prevents the hair follicles from going to sleep, and causing the hair loss.
In addition to diagnosing and treating any underlying disorder, treatments for alopecia areata include immunomodulating agents and biologic response modifiers (Table 5).6 Although topical and oral corticosteroids have been used, the treatment of choice in patients older than 10 years with patchy alopecia areata affecting less than 50 percent of the scalp is intralesional corticosteroid injections (Figure 8).6
“I think their effectiveness is not as significant as finasteride or minoxidil,” says Dr. Wolfeld, “however, it’s something that can be used quite easily by patients at home. If they use it two or three times a week, I tell them it can help to thicken their hair.” Results can take up to 18 months to show up, so Dr. Wolfeld stresses that patience is a virtue.
Each hair develops from a follicle — a narrow pocket in the skin — and goes through three phases of growth. Anagen (A), the active growth phase, lasts two to seven years. Catagen (), the transition phase, lasts about two weeks. During this phase, the hair shaft moves upward toward the skin's surface, and the dermal papilla (the structure that nourishes cells that give rise to hair) begins to separate from the follicle. Telogen (C), the resting phase, lasts around three months and culminates in the shedding of the hair shaft.
Dr. Williams is an author, researcher, internationally renown hair surgeon, and lecturer in hair loss surgery and disorders. He is Diplomate of the American Board of Hair Restoration Surgery, Fellow of the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery. He primary practices as a hair restoration surgeon and physician offering medical and surgical treatment for hair loss disorders for men and women. He has been practicing medicine, surgery, and cosmetic surgical care in Orange County since 1986 and a native and lifelong resident of Orange County. He completed his undergraduate premedical studies in 1980 at the University of California, Irvine; and a graduated from medical school in 1984 from the Western University of Health Sciences in Pomona, California.
Alopecia areata is not contagious.[9] It occurs more frequently in people who have affected family members, suggesting heredity may be a factor.[9] Strong evidence of genetic association with increased risk for alopecia areata was found by studying families with two or more affected members. This study identified at least four regions in the genome that are likely to contain these genes.[14] In addition, alopecia areata shares genetic risk factors with other autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, and celiac disease.[3] It may be the only manifestation of celiac disease.[15][16]
I’m 42 and I noticed my front top and sides thinning about a year ago – a lot coming out when brushing after washing. I went to the doctor who happened to be African-American (I’m caucasion) and she actually asked me if I wore “corn rows” a lot! Needless to say, she was worthless and just prescribed me something for dandruff, which I do not have! I went to an endocrinologist to see if my thyroid or menopause was the problem – tests turned out honky dorie! Now I can see through the top of my head when the sun shines on it (scar-y) and I’m having to cover over the temple areas with sweeps of hair from the other side (interesting, the right side is much thinner). I will say that I’ve gone through hell and back with a mentally ill young adult but if it was stress, wouldn’t it have come out quicker than just in the last year (I’ve been dealing with his illness for 7 years now)?? I’ve heard that sometimes it takes 2 or 3 blood tests and doctors to finally see that one has thyroid problems. Is this the experience of others, and would I be throwing my money away by seeing my general practitioner?
Many medical conditions can cause hair loss, with thyroid disease a common culprit. Thyroid problems include both an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) and an overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism). Because hair growth depends on the proper functioning of the thyroid gland, abnormal levels of thyroid hormone produced by this gland can result in hair changes, along with many other side effects, if left untreated. When there is too much thyroid hormone, the hair on your head can become fine, with thinning hair all over the scalp. When there is too little of this hormone, there can be hair loss, not just on the scalp, but also anywhere on the body.
Hello everyone. I am a 14 yr old girl that is loosing my hair. I know that may seem young, but I knew it was coming. My father and I have the same hair and it runs in his family to have hair loss at an early age. I have been loosing my hair since I was ten. It hasn’t been chunks, but if you add the hair together, that is alot of hair loss. So I was wondering if anyone had any information they could help me out with, other than seeing a doctor. My mom is taking me, even though we don’t know what to expect. I mean, this is genetic so I’m praying there is a cure somehow to either stop my hair from falling or adding hair on my head. Please help! If anyone has any advice please let me know immediately. I thank you for your time.
I am scared to find out whether I have PCOS…I was hoping to find out about my insulin as I sensed a major blood sugar problem for years, but I took the news surprisingly poorly. I’m more stressed than before and am terribly depressed. The doctor, by the way, had zero to say about it all. Nothing. His words “Ask your gynocologist, I am just a lowly MD.” [gasp]
CURRENT REGIMEN: 6 weeks ago I purchased Hair Essentials… and am seeing some fine hair growth. Weight loss & exercise can also heighten follicular dormancy. (Have lost 90 lbs. in the last year.) Important to maintain 50-60mg/daily protein levels, as well as routine multi-vitamin, higher levels of B-Complex, D and Calcium levels while dieting… heavily impacts hair, nails & skin. Am researching possible relationship between gastrointestinal health and hair loss.
^ Lenane P, Pope E, Krafchik B (February 2005). "Congenital alopecia areata". Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology (Case Reports. Review). 52 (2 Suppl 1): 8–11. doi:10.1016/j.jaad.2004.06.024. PMID 15692503. We believe AA should be classified not only as an acquired but also a congenital form of nonscarring hair loss. It may well be more common than is thought because of lack of recognition
Diphencyprone (DPCP): This medicine is applied to the bald skin. It causes a small allergic reaction. When the reaction occurs, a patient has redness, swelling, and itching. Dermatologists believe this allergic reaction tricks the immune system, causing it to send white blood cells to the surface of the scalp. This fights the inflammation. It also prevents the hair follicles from going to sleep, and causing the hair loss.

Though we think our hair is super important, our bodies consider it nonessential (read: we don’t need it to stay conscious). Other bodily functions, like breathing, are more pressing and get first access to the nutrients in our diet. Our hair gets the leftovers. Protein is your hair's best friend, so reach for healthy protein such as eggs and fish and avoid fasting or yoyo dieting. These can deprive your body of these essential building blocks for a healthy scalp and hair. Wild salmon, tuna and trout are packed with omega-3 fatty acids that help provide moisture and prevent dry and brittle hair. Foods rich in B vitamins also help keep hair follicles healthy, decreasing the risk for hair loss. Fruits and vegetables, and beans and lean meat sources, such as chicken or turkey breast, are all great sources for vitamin B.
My scalp is pain-free but has on occasion flared again but 1/100 of the original pain. My scalp still needs frequent shampooing (I could go weeks without it before) to keep the dermatitis at bay. My hair and scalp are still fairly dry and brittle despite aloe for moisture, avocado oil to moisturize and seal in moisture and Behentrimonium Methosulfate to close cuticles, provide slip and halt hair snapping, BUT the breakage is 90% better. I’m still too afraid to go back to humectants though I know they’re amazing as moisture-retainers for dehydrated hair. I have spots of completely missing hair towards my hairline that hasn’t and will probably never regrow but I’m focusing on nursing everything else back to health. 

"Despite some of the claims, a shampoo or conditioner won’t be able to stop or slow hair loss, nor help with a receding hairline or thicken hair that’s becoming thinner," says trichologist Anabel Kingsley from The Philip Kingsley Trichology Clinic in London. "At best, a thickening shampoo will make hair temporarily thicker for a short period of time, but they certainly won’t help with hair loss or thinning."

Taking hair supplements can be helpful for anyone who is experiencing hair loss or hair thinning. Dendy Engelman, MD, a board-certified dermatologic surgeon at Medical Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery in New York City, previously recommended Nutrafol, a research-backed hair supplement, to Prevention. "This uses highly concentrated botanicals to address every stage of the growth cycle," she says. Nutrafol's hair supplements include vitamin E and ashwagandha (an adaptogen that helps balance cortisol levels in the body), among others.
In May I was diagnosed with rhuematoid arthritis and was put on arava, which is known to cause hair loss. After four months I noticed I was losing a bit more hair than normal so the rhuematologist added Enbrel, which I inject once a week. After a month on both my hair really started to fall out and thin. The nurse practitioner (who thinks she’s an MD) told me to stop the Arava and not to stress about it. Yeah, right! I went back to my gyne who ran lab work and found my testosterone level to be 235, way high! I had an MRI of my adrenal glands and my ovaries since these two produce testosterone. I also had an ultrasound of my ovaries. All exams were normal.
The complex actions of genetics, DHT, shifting of hormone ratios and age-related volume loss can commonly occur in women in their 40’s and 50’s. However, just like in men, genetic hair loss can appear at all ages after puberty.  In fact, hair loss occurs with relatively high frequency even in women in their 20’s and 30’s. The majority of women with female pattern hair loss initially develop diffuse thinning over the front and top of the scalp, while maintaining the frontal hairline. This thinning may present with a widening through the central part line while others may present initially with either episodic or continuous hair shedding, prior to any noticeable decrease in hair volume. In addition, thinning may also be seen throughout the scalp, including the temple areas as well as the back and sides.
I got really sick at the age 40, 2 years after my second child was born,I started losing weight,I went from 54kg down to 47kg,my skin was splitting on the backs of my legs,both my hands,I had blisters up my arms ,on the tops of my feet,migraines that would have me vomiting none stop for ten hours,then only to sleep for 2 days to recover,no doctors were interested,I saw 8 and they all wanted me on anxiety medication because I was going through a break up that was there answer to the way I was feeling.No one wanted to listen to me.Almost feeling like
I’m interested in what took place 4 months before the onset of your hair loss (and others with telogen effluvium). For me, it has always been either a baby born or a course of antibiotics. Oral birth control can also cause a sudden change in the gut flora–as can pretty much any medication. Staph infections are another connection I think should be pursued. Some women don’t know they’re colonized with Staph but they constantly have dry, cracked (mild or severe) sores in their noses.

I too have suffered from hair loss, more noticebly over the past 2 year, although it first started 10 years ago. I am 39 female and always had a full head of hair. Now, my hair has gone dry, dull and and has lost it volume. I have been to my Dr and have had test done, however everything has come back ok. i.e. my hair los was not found to be down to any internal deficiencies hormones, nutrient levels, diseases etc , so now my Dr is referring me to a dermatoligst to see if the problem is due to the skin on my scalp. However it maybe advisable if you havent already, to visit a licesend Trichologist, this is someone who specifically deals with the scientific study of the health of hair and scalp, and would have a more thorough knowledge about your hair than any GP and by conducting a hair analysis, can identify your hair loss problem. I intially visited, and it was he who suggested I go along to my GP and ask for specific types of tests. However, he also informed me for some cases there are conditions that can be cured, but with other, it could simply be that hair loss pattern is heriditary which can occur in both male and female ( this does not necessarily need to come from your parents or grandparent, it could come from family gene from generations back, that so happened to show up in you generations later!). In this case, the frank truth is little can be done. However there are different topical treatments, and people do not have to go to the extreme of hair surgery or even having to wear undignified wigs. Below is a link to a product called Toppik which I have used. Basically it small fibre which are made from the same fibres as natrual hair, which use sprink onto your hair to cover bald and thinning areas. It adds body, volume, and makes your hair ‘magically’ appear full regardless of the lenghth of your hair. Its not expensive, and also come with conditoner and shampoo to give your hair that added volume, even to the most thinnest of hair. I hope this will provide some solution and even comfort to those experiencing hair loss. The link is below – Good luck
Too much stress is bad for health and beauty, but did you know there’s a known connection between stress and hair loss, too? Constant stress can cause cortisol levels to spike, which can contribute to increased hair shedding. To relieve stress and its damaging effects on your hair, try meditation, regular exercise, keeping a regular sleep schedule, or any other activity that helps you decompress.
I just began reading this post this evening. My hair loss began when I was 18, currently 29. No bald spots, but it just keeps getting thinner and thinner and thinner. I have been to many doctors as well. Every PCP and family doctor have been of no help. After four dermatologists I have given up on that as well. I went to Hans Wiemann (in the St. Louis area) that offers laser treatments and hair transplants. The whole appointment was such a sales pitch that I was so aggravated and felt worse by the time I left. I have also tried an herbalist, chinese medicine, and a nutritionist/chiropractor. I try not to think about it, I really do, but let’s face it, that’s about impossible. I know my problem is NOT genetic, everyone in my family has a full head of hair. I’m healthy in terms of exercise and diet, I don’t take any medications, smoke, or drink. None of the doctors have ever found anything with blood work or urine samples. If anyone can suggest a doctor, specialist, anyone that can help in the St. Louis or Chicago area, PLEASE do let me know.
Speaking of a new style: Don’t choose one that’s so high maintenance that it needs to be heat styled daily—the damage you’ll do with too much hot tool usage can leave strands damaged and fried, and breaking before it can grow to a certain length. Plus, thinner hair tends to break easier, so you want to avoid any extra damage-inducing practices at all costs. Make a conscious effort, too, to brush more gently, and use a moisturizing and reparative hair mask to hydrate hair and nourish the scalp—where hair gets most of its strength.
*All medications have both common (generic) and brand names. The brand name is what a specific manufacturer calls the product (e.g., Tylenol®). The common name is the medical name for the medication (e.g., acetaminophen). A medication may have many brand names, but only one common name. This article lists medications by their common names. For information on a given medication, check our Drug Information database. For more information on brand names, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. 

Anagen effluvium is rapid hair loss resulting from medical treatment, such as chemotherapy. These potent and fast-acting medications kill cancer cells, but they may also shut down hair follicle production in the scalp and other parts of the body. After chemotherapy ends, hair usually grows back on its own. Dermatologists can offer medication to help hair grow back more quickly.
The main symptom of alopecia areata is hair loss. Hair usually falls out in small patches on the scalp. These patches are often several centimeters or less. Hair loss might also occur on other parts of the face, like the eyebrows, eyelashes, and beard, as well as other parts of the body. Some people lose hair in a few places. Others lose it in a lot of spots.

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“While nutritious eating isn’t going to bring your hair back by any means, eating plenty of protein-rich foods and healthy fats can make the hair that you still have look thicker and shinier.” Skimping on the B vitamins in particular can interfere with the formation of hair cells and, therefore, hair growth. The best sources of Bs are protein-packed foods like chicken, fish, eggs, and pork, as well as leafy greens such as spinach. (These foods are also good for melting belly fat, so it’s a win win).
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