I am so so grateful and want to thank everyone who has contributed to this forum. I am 52 years old, and in June of this year my Obgyn said it was time for me to get off Birth control pills , as I was getting too old and the estrogen levels would be dangerous at this time. I had been on BCP since the age of 18 with a break from the age of 35-38, and always been under the impression that BC pills might cause hair loss, but was totally unaware that when you came off them that the real deal happened. He just casually said, don’t take them and we will see if you are in menopause. Well I did and 2 months later (mid Aug..) I went straight into menopause, hot flashes all day, night sweats, etc., Then came the shedding, TE, as I am to understand. By mid-September the texture of my hair felt strange and the hair on the right side/back of my hair thinned out considerably, and I was developing a bald patch. Having always had very thin hair that I was always self conscious about (I had to wear a wig as a child, as I had monilethrix an inherited hair disease, which went into remission, but the hair loss caused terrible self esteem issues throughout my teenage years.), I cried my eyes out, then went on a quest to find out who to see. Derm, another ObGyn or endocrinologist? From everything that I had read, everyone went to countless doctors to find a cure. Having dealt with my HMO over the years to get a quality specialist in different areas, I knew I would be bald by the time I found the right doctor. Then I came across this forum, like Hope in Aug, I have spent countless hours on the internet in search of a solution. Thanks to her post and Toni on 7/14/08 and Shelleo, I found my answer. I called Dr. Redmond, in New York, and prayed that I could get an appointment right away. My prayers were answered, and I have an appointment this coming Monday 10/28!! I will be getting his book I the next day or so, as recommended, and truly feel, from what I have read, if anyone can help me, he is the one. Thank you for sharing your stories. I will make sure to check back, so I can, too, possibly help someone else.
The best fix by far for replacing lost hair is a transplant. Back in the day, docs used plugs that resembled cornrows (definitely not natural looking). Today, guys have more options. You can go for “the strip method” where a doctor surgically removes a strip of hair from the back of your head, dissects every hair graft under a microscope, and then plants the individual grafts onto hair-thin areas of your scalp with tiny incisions.
Just happened to find this website and have spent 3 hrs getting to know the trials us women go through with or without our hair. I have cried with you, laughed with you and felt your pain. I have frontal fibrosing alopecia and have gone to Stanford Medical Center and saw a dermatologist. I have been using clobetasol 0.05% topical solution on my hair line and sides every night and morning as well as take finasteride 2.5mg daily. Not sure if it is doing anything and what falls out will never grow back with scaring alopecia. If it gets to the point where I can’t hide it anymore I will get a real hair wig. The main thing is how beautiful each and every one of you are! The light you shine towards others makes you beautiful and makes us feel beautiful! Being thankful for what we do have always lifts the spirit and our outward appearance.
So far, I’ve only been on the Propecia for about three weeks. I don’t notice any side-effects thus far. I am taking 2.5 mg of Proscar, to be exact. I feel good and have not noticed any difference in my hair. I continue to lose about 20 hairs when I shower and brush it each day. That may not sound like a lot but I have already lost so much of my hair, that I think that represents more hair loss than it sounds. At least it is stable for now…I thank GOD that it is not getting worse. I DO have re-growth but it is fine and “wispy” as you said. It is not the same as the rest of my “normal” hair but hey, at least some of it is growing back in. Slowly and finer. That seems to support the AGA diagnosis. The thing that really drives me crazy is that I still don’t know WHY the TE started in the first place. The TE unmasked the AGA, but why the damn TE and what from here? Anyway….I digress and obsses!
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I’m dieing I needed someone to listen to me.I ended up leaving my home town to see an endroconologist in the city yep I had Hasimotos thyrioditis which wasn’t just one symptom I had them all serve fatigue,bad skin,nails,hair,my digestive system wasn’t working properly,that was a major shut down to my body coming from someone who always was fit and look after my body.got me on medication and away I go but wasn’t that easy,I was really sick ,my medication was being prescribed by my doctor but over medicating me ,I didn’t no much and kept returning to my doctor always feeling unwell to look after my small children being a single mum all on my own with no family and friends to help. Sick of feeling like this back to my endo for more test sick of the pain that was starting in my scalp and hair loss bad,I went of my medication because I felt better of it,well that was the biggest mistake ,he said my body would have gone into thyriod storm and would end up in ICU,and not to ever do that again.Well 8 years on the pain in my scalp s still bad, iv seen specialist about my hair told me I had alepecia 8 injection in my scalp,and what a painful night.I have hair shedding for the last 4 years and I cry a lot from the pain and the lose of hair .I have very long hair and when I plait it it’s the thickness of two pencils,bbbbbuuuuttt my doctor says there is nothing wrong with my hair,I feel like punching her. I have spent years reading books,and articles trying to fix myself but still nothing,I have seen naturopaths, physiotherapist ,psychologist to talk about the pain in my head and feeling sick all a time ,it’s like we’re do you go.So ladies in all the articles Iv read I still have no help with my hair and it seems lots out there like me.looks like we have to suck it up
Hair doesn’t make the man. Remind yourself of everything else you have to offer. Or take care of things you can control, like staying in shape. It’s OK to look to others for support. And if you need a little inspiration, think of bald men or guys with shaved heads who ooze confidence, like The Rock, Vin Diesel, and Pitbull. Consider yourself in good company.
Low-level laser light brushes, combs and other devices which are FDA-cleared for both men and women are available without a prescription. Although it’s not clear how the devices work, it’s thought to “stimulate the hair follicles’ energy cells to be more active,” Francis said. They’re also foolproof, telling you when and how far to move the device and they even automatically shut off.
Why? Unwanted hair growth (sideburns, for example) is a reported side effect of minoxidil. The belief is that a higher concentration of minoxidil would result in more unwanted hair, which is why women are instructed to use it less often. However, the study in Skin Therapy Letter reports that unwanted hair was more common in 2 percent minoxidil solutions than 5 percent, and women are instructed to use Rogaine’s 2 percent solution twice daily — so what gives?
My hair started thining out this past year. I notice my hair falling out when i got pregnant with my son. I got diabetes with my pregnancy. my scalp itches and it hurts. It feels like i had my hair tied up so tight and let it go. it hurts to move my hair. i saw a dermatologist and said it was due to the stress of child birth. it has been over a year and is still falling out. has anyone heard of this and what i can do. My Pcp check my hormone levels and said everything is fine. I need help.
Shedding is never fun — just ask my vacuum cleaner. It’s even less fun when you realize the golf ball size bits of hair you’re tugging out of the roller came from your own head. Oh, the horror! As we get older (yes ladies, this is for you too) our once glorious crown of healthy hair can become brittle, or even worse, be genetically predisposed to jump ship, leaving our poor, bald heads to fend for themselves.

One of the most significant concerns for patients following a diagnosis of cancer is the side effect of losing their hair. For many, especially for those who have experienced a full, thick head of hair throughout their lifetime, the thought of losing it can be devastating. Chemotherapy treatment owes its effectiveness to a variety of powerful medications which are designed to quickly attack the compromised, cancerous cells. Unfortunately, in addition to treating cancer, the medications also attack the roots of your hair. This can cause the hair to fall out very quickly, even in large clumps, or gradually over time. Some of the most common medications leading to hair loss include:


Interesting reading all the stories, I had great hair until 15 years ago,and then the texture of my hair drastically changed. It be became “dead hair” wirery. I call it it my chicken feathers just taking its time to fall out which it has done over a long period of time, but I now have bald spots on the sides and thinning in my bangs. I started buying wigs years ago knowing that this was something that was inevitable. I’ve had all the tests and tried all the products, nothing..just curious if anyone else has had the “dead hair” issue
Hair transplants are not an options for a very large proportion of women with genetic hair loss as the pattern of hair loss is diffuse or the amount of thinning is not suitable for restoration.  Also, hair transplantation is not an option for women with chronic telogen effluvium, nor for women with active frontal fibrosing alopecia, lichen planopilaris and a host of other conditions. 
In answer to which doctor should I see for my hair loss, my opinion is that you should probably see both. Most doctors don’t know enough about hair loss as it is, so seeing doctors in different specialties may actually help you get a better, more accurate diagnosis. I am sure there are various conditions of hair loss that might be better served by seeing one more than the other. Perhaps a dermatologist would be better suited in determining if the cause was an infectious skin condition such as ringworm or scaring alopecia, and an endocrinologist may be better at diagnosing hormone related hair loss. The truth is, any doctor whether it is an endocrinologist, dermatologist, or general practitioner with a strong interest and knowledge in hair loss can make a proper diagnosis and work with you on the the treatment they think will produce the best results. The operative words here are “interest and knowledge.” 

Please help. My hair has always been my pride and joy. I figured since it is pretty damn healthy, it could deal with some bleach damage. And I figured the master stylist who did all the color-corrections would know how much would be too much. I was wrong, and now I want to burst into tears every time I look at my hair or touch it. I just don't know what to do. my hair has also NEVER been shorter than this and it breaks and falls out. What should i do to regrow hair?
Onion - A study published in the Journal of Dermatology examined the results when onion juice was used in people with alopecia areata. Twenty-three people applied onion juice directly to the scalp twice daily for two months. Participants began to experience hair growth after just two weeks of treatment. At four weeks, hair regrowth was seen in 17 people and at six weeks, hair growth was apparent in 20 people.
Hair doesn’t make the man. Remind yourself of everything else you have to offer. Or take care of things you can control, like staying in shape. It’s OK to look to others for support. And if you need a little inspiration, think of bald men or guys with shaved heads who ooze confidence, like The Rock, Vin Diesel, and Pitbull. Consider yourself in good company.
Hair is a cutaneous appendage - just like sweat glands and oil glands.  As a result, dermatologists treat ALL forms of hair loss not just the most common form, androgenetic alopecia. There are many forms of alopecia - alopecia areata, telogen effluvium, lichen planopilaris, congenital hypotrichosis.....to name a few. The treatment and management of all hair loss disorders is an integral part of a dermatologist's training and board certification.  -Dr. Keaney

Alopecia areata typically causes a few temporary bald patches on the scalp. It tends to run in families and often strikes in childhood. The hair loss seems to be part of an immune system problem, in which the body's natural defences mistakenly attack its own tissue. Once the hair has fallen out in certain spots, new growth is suppressed for weeks or months. This type of alopecia sometimes affects people who have other "autoimmune" diseases like thyroid disease, lupus, or pernicious anemia. Sometimes, it may produce complete scalp baldness (alopecia totalis) or total loss of body hair (alopecia universalis).


Some of the skin disorders like lupus and sarcoidosis can cause hair loss. In case of lupus, the hair tends to get brittle and may fall out in patches. Lupus hairs or short, broken hairs usually appear above the forehead. Hair loss is not permanent in general here. Some individuals with lupus also develop a form of lupus known as discoid or cutaneous lupus that affects the skin. Scars that sometimes develop on the skin of the scalp may lead to hair loss.

Women also may experience AGA, often with thinning in the central and frontal scalp area but usually without frontal–temporal recession (Figure 3). A history and physical examination aimed at detecting conditions of hyperandrogenism, such as hirsutism, ovarian abnormalities, menstrual irregularities, acne, and infertility are indicated. Laboratory tests are of little value in women with AGA who do not have characteristics of hyperandrogenism.5
Re-growing hair: It is likely that the hair will grow back even without treatment. It may fall out again, though. Most patients lose their hair more than once before the disease goes away for good. Even people who lose all the hair on their scalp and body can have their hair grow back. When hair loss is widespread (lots of hair loss on the scalp and/or body), there is a greater chance that the hair will not re-grow.
when i was 24, went to so. america to visit family. they hadn’t seen me since my last visit, which was when i was 17. there was a guy who i had liked and hung out with when i spent my 17th summer there and was excited to see him once again, “as an adult”. i think it was the second day or so of hanging out with him when he says to me: “hey, i noticed you’re losing your hair”. i was beyond embarrassed at that moment and all i could muster out was, “yeah, i know”. thanks for pointing it out there buddy. next came anger mixed with that embarrassment. i felt, and still feel, that people stare at my head and notice my thinning hair when they are talking to me. when i came back to the states a few weeks later, the first thing i did was make an appt with my pcp. she referred me to an endocrinologist who found my testosterone level slightly elevated. it was in the 70 range. i didn’t have masculinization going on so she told me she didn’t want to put me on medication and to return if i noticed in increase or changes in symptoms.
Evaluating and treating hair loss (alopecia) is an important part of primary care, yet many physicians find it complex and confusing. Hair loss affects men and women of all ages and frequently has significant social and psychologic consequences. This article reviews the physiology of normal hair growth, common causes of hair loss, and treatments currently available for alopecia.
I am 18 years old and about a month ago i noticed my hair falling out increasingly fast. It has scared me to death. I’ve gone to see my general practitioner and he said that hair goes through shedding stages and that it is normal. It is definitely not normal for me. I insisted that he check my thyroid and my results came back normal. My family just repeatedly tells me that I’m crazy and have no reason to worry. I have just purchased an apartment with my friends and will start college in the fall. I am terrified to begin my new life with a hair loss problem. My hair has always been my best feature. It has always been thick, healthy, beautifully wavy, and I have always received compliments on it. I am emotionally devastated to watch my hair fall out in large amounts just from taking a shower or brushing my hair. It is nice to know that I’m not crazy, or alone. Thank You All!
Hello I gave up years ago and have been wearing hair pieces. If u live in Nj I know someone who will come to your house or you can go to his and he will make you a custom piece depending on your needs. I started the journey again because I noticed that my daughter is starting to resemble me. I want to get treAted so that I have an answer for her. I really can’t afford dr. Redmond but I am giving it a try. I will share my experience.
I know how upsetting it is to start to notice thinning hair. Mine has been thinning for the last two yrs. I am not longer able to style my hair at all because of lack of thickness. I know in my case its memopause, plus some meds I am on. I do take biotin, and would appriciate any advice on shampoos that might help make the hair look thicker. I No loner put bleach in my hair, but do you a color with no bleach. I have gotten my self a little hair peice that clips on, and going to have it colored, trimed for me, and use that when going out.. Some hair pices a are very, very, nice. I would suggest you look into them untill some cure comes about. My Partner in Life brought it for me because he knows how upset I have been about my Hair.. Nice guy for sure. Good luck to all.. This is a place that I hope every woman finds who is having this problem.
It’s also possible that some of Harklinikken’s users are women whose hair would have grown back even if they’d done nothing. Many women who arrive in a dermatologist’s office with prior diagnoses of female pattern hair loss actually have what’s called telogen effluvium. That’s a period of acute shedding of hair — meaning up to 60 percent of hair — three months after a triggering event like pregnancy, significant weight loss or starting or stopping hormone medications.
I have had hair loss for the past several years. I have seen both endocrinologists and dermatologists. I had one derm who was good, but I unfortunately moved. She put me on minoxidil 5% and spironolactone. I am now seeing and endo but he has me on Synthroid and I was very interested to read on this site that it can actually be a cause of hair loss! If anyone can recommend a doctor in Chicago i would appreciate it. I see there are 2 other people asking for recommendations but I haven’t seen responses to them. Thanks!
I’m going to see an endocrinologist, a trichologist, a hematologist and a gastroenterologist and maybe this Dr. Redmond. I’m done with ‘hair loss experts’ pushing cosmetic surgery and trying the all around approach. My insurance is crap, but….Anyway, thanks all for your stories and knowing I’m not alone in hair loss and the fight against disinterested medical establishment. xxx
Thank you for all your post. My daughter had extremely thick hair about eight years ago. It was so thick you could barely put it in a scrunchie. Her hair has been continuously thinning to the point that you can see through it. All the women in my family on both sides have extremely thick hair. We live in the north east and have seen several GP and a Dermatologist who act like there is nothing wrong. I work in the medical field and when I hear this I get so mad because I feel like they want to just brush of like no big deal. It is a big deal to all women no matter what ages. I have written done some of the post advise and will continue to look for an endocrinologist for her. Please keep me postes on any new developements.

Most people naturally shed about 50 to 100 hairs a day, but sometimes men and women can shed much more, leading to thinning hair, hair loss, and over time, baldness. The causes of this hair loss can be a result of hormones, underlying medical conditions, and even certain medications like antidepressants, high-blood pressure medications, and NSAIDS (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications). Sometimes, hair loss is purely genetic and can run in families.
You ARE the same inside, but you are also different… you’ve been through a lot and it is so difficult to to stay strong through this experience. I won’t even go into the hair stuff, because it sounds to me that this is not what your post is about. You need to get some really solid support and find something other than your hair to focus on. You need an awesome hair system…and support system. From there, I hope and pray for you, that you will be able to find happiness and balance in your life again. You are a glorious human…don’t doubt that for a moment!
I’m going to see an endocrinologist, a trichologist, a hematologist and a gastroenterologist and maybe this Dr. Redmond. I’m done with ‘hair loss experts’ pushing cosmetic surgery and trying the all around approach. My insurance is crap, but….Anyway, thanks all for your stories and knowing I’m not alone in hair loss and the fight against disinterested medical establishment. xxx
“A scalp biopsy is the gold standard for diagnosing hair loss,” said Dr. Marc Avram, a dermatologist in private practice with offices in Manhattan and Brooklyn. “The test examines the follicles themselves and can help determine whether the hair loss is genetic, inflammatory, infectious or due to an unusual physical or emotional shock to the system.”
Trying to figure out exactly what is causing your hair loss is going to require a little detective work on the part of your physician. Several lab tests are going to need to be done. I’ll make sure to make another post this week about the standard lab tests that should be ordered to start the process. Hopefully you don’t have to bring the list to the doctors office, he/she should know already. I get concerned when women have to bring a list of tests that should be ordered to their doctor. My feeling is that if they don’t know what to order then how are they going to be able to accurately read the results. But… a good doctor is a good doctor, and if you have one that really cares and takes a strong interest in your hair loss with a willingness to work with you in finding the cause then great.

Minoxidil (Rogaine, generic versions). This drug was initially introduced as a treatment for high blood pressure, but people who took it noticed that they were growing hair in places where they had lost it. Research studies confirmed that minoxidil applied directly to the scalp could stimulate hair growth. As a result of the studies, the FDA originally approved over-the-counter 2% minoxidil to treat hair loss in women. Since then a 5% solution has also become available when a stronger solution is need for a woman's hair loss.

Aside from medication and lasers, some opt for hair transplants — a procedure where hairs are removed from another part of your body and then transplanted to the thinning or balding areas. Does it work? In a word, yes. Research suggests that most hair transplant recipients report are "very satisfied" with their results. While successful, transplants are also far more expensive than medications, foams, or lasers with costs averaging anywhere from $4,000 or $15,000.

I too have been having bad hair loss. I am 25 years old and since the birth of my second child 2 1/2 years ago, it has not stopped. It is normal for it to fall out for a few months after child birth so I wasn’t too worried at first. After about 6 months it started to slow down then all of a sudden started up again. And has been falling out ever since. I am really thin in the front and around the temples and just recently, has become really unhealthy. It breaks and is very course. I have been to 3 derms. and 2 PCP’s. All my lab work has always come back normal. And they just tell me to use Rogain. The past 6 months I have been trying to get pregnant again and haven’t been able to. I got pregnant with my last 2 very easy and feel that my hair loss and not being able to get pregnant are intertwined. I also have gained about 15 pounds. I don’t want to use the Rogain because I am trying to get pregnant and don’t know the effects it will have if I did get pregnant. I don’t know what to do next. I am in the Phoenix area so if anyone know of any good docs around here please let me know.
There are numerous diseases that can affect the hair and scalp. Hair loss can be caused by a variety of conditions. Diseases such as alopecia areata, anemia, male/female pattern baldness, and infections of the scalp can all cause significant difficulty and loss of daily well-being. Stanford Dermatology has established a special clinic focusing on the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders of the hair.
So in closing, I echo my initial sentiments that I would always suggest seeing more than one doctor if possible. Look for one that is not only knowledgeable but one that also cares. Hair loss is not the same thing has having a blackhead removed from your back and requires more sensitivity and emotional understanding on the part of the physician. Ask a lot of questions and do your own research, even after receiving your “diagnosis.” Doctors are people and make mistakes too, this is your body and you have to be comfortable with the treatment.
Each hair develops from a follicle — a narrow pocket in the skin — and goes through three phases of growth. Anagen (A), the active growth phase, lasts two to seven years. Catagen (), the transition phase, lasts about two weeks. During this phase, the hair shaft moves upward toward the skin's surface, and the dermal papilla (the structure that nourishes cells that give rise to hair) begins to separate from the follicle. Telogen (C), the resting phase, lasts around three months and culminates in the shedding of the hair shaft.

Hello I gave up years ago and have been wearing hair pieces. If u live in Nj I know someone who will come to your house or you can go to his and he will make you a custom piece depending on your needs. I started the journey again because I noticed that my daughter is starting to resemble me. I want to get treAted so that I have an answer for her. I really can’t afford dr. Redmond but I am giving it a try. I will share my experience.


Finally people who understands what I am going through …I am in a desperate search for doctors in the Miami/Boca Raton, Florida area. Can anyone help? I dont know yet what has been causing my hair loss…I had been loosing some hair throighout the years, and sometimes it gets lees severe but lately has just gotten worse and there is no stopping it seems. I had mt Tyroid checked by PCP a coulpe months ago and my iron level also looked normal …getting desperate. Would appreciate some help.
Ann, I’m so sorry to hear about your home. That breaks my heart for you. I wish you the best in recovery of your home and blessings on your finances. But I do have to say I think that only losing 20 sounds like a dream! I absolutely know that my TE was triggered by PPD in hair dye. I only wish that I would have figured it out sooner. I was forewarned with itching for a year, no dandruff flaking or anything just itching and that was my body trying to heal itself against the allergy and the all hell broke lose on my head! Please keep me posted propecia; I wouldn’t even look for any improvement for 6 months though. But please be here when you do see it! Have a blessed day!
If you find yourself snacking at night before bed, it may be because you're bored or anxious — not truly hungry — and eating makes you feel better. Try eating a healthy dinner a bit later in the evening. If your stomach is truly growling before bed, try a protein-based snack like a hard-boiled egg or a slice of cheese. A few spoonfuls of yogurt or some fruit is another good option. 
A hair restoration is a surgical procedure, but per government regulations, any physician of any background with a valid medical license, regardless of training, presence or lack of any board certificate in anything at all, is permitted to call themselves a "hair restoration surgeon."  For instance, a psychiatrist, who has not even seen a surgical instrument in 20 years, can tomorrow decide that he would like to be a hair restoration surgeon, and offer the surgery to the public.  Therefore it is important to make sure your surgeon has actual surgery training, which is usually a 5 to 7 year course of intense training in the years immediately following medical school, and upon successful completion, surgeons receive a board certificate in their chosen specialty.
Also, re: the Proscar, I think that it may already be helping some as I think my shedding may be tapering off a bit more. I am losing a few less hairs Per day now. Maybe? I don’t know, but I am trying to stay positive!! I have no real regrowth. Just wisps, extremely fine hair, almost hard to see. Kind of transparent. I am not expecting miracles, but trust me…. THe moment I feel I have any true results to share with you girls, I will definitely be posting them! There aren’t many success stories out here. We need more. I guess people don’t come out here as much if they are experiencing good things w their hair?
My current solution is this : I have bought clip in hair extensions from Sally’s Beauty Supply store (about 100$) I actually just trim them myself and dye the hair left on my head and the extensions using an ammonia free hair dye (L’oreal or Garnier) in order for them to blend. I use a lot of root lifter and fill in the balding spots with Toppik (dark brown) and top it off with a shine spray. I’m telling you, most people have NO clue of my problem. I feel this is the best way to feel like a woman as I continue on this quest to solve my hair loss problem. I’d be happy to tell more of you about the regimine … high maintenance yes, but you know what, we all have to do what we need to do.
Thank you for everyone who read and responded to my original post! Thank you Pilar for the reference! After seeing the doctors I mentioned and with time lapsing after quitting A-Ret (generic Retin-A) the IMMENSE scalp pain went away. My dermatitis also eventually cleared with aspirin masks (pulverized aspirin 2-3, honey and water) and much more frequent (and unfortunately stripping) shampooing with natural formulas.
"Dr. Yaker is ABSOLUTELY AMAZING! He is innovative, highly professional, incredibly skilled and extremely passionate about hair restoration. His bedside manner is one of complete dedication and compassion with genuine care for his patients and their needs. He strives for excellence in everything he does, and it's evidenced by his loyal client following and their satisfaction with their incredible outcomes. I'd recommend him to anyone & everyone interested in hair restoration or transplantation."
There are numerous diseases that can affect the hair and scalp. Hair loss can be caused by a variety of conditions. Diseases such as alopecia areata, anemia, male/female pattern baldness, and infections of the scalp can all cause significant difficulty and loss of daily well-being. Stanford Dermatology has established a special clinic focusing on the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders of the hair.
I have Alopecia Areata, Hoshimoto Thyroiditus, both are autoimmune diseases. I also now am losing hair all over my head. I have itching, redness, pustules and think it may be Cicatricial Alopecia (Scaring Alopecia). I have tried Biotin 10,000mcg per day for 3 yrs didn’t work, also Nioxin didn’t work. Minoxidil 5% worked the first time I lost some hair but not anymore. I have been given oils, creams, and still no luck.I went to a Derm and he didn’t seem to care. I am embarrassed to go out becauseyoou can really see my scalp through my very thin hair. I use to have very thick hair but that is gone. I can’t afford a wig and don’t know where to turn now. I have to support where I live (Rialto, Calif.). Any Ideas?
The main symptom of alopecia areata is hair loss. Hair usually falls out in small patches on the scalp. These patches are often several centimeters or less. Hair loss might also occur on other parts of the face, like the eyebrows, eyelashes, and beard, as well as other parts of the body. Some people lose hair in a few places. Others lose it in a lot of spots.
PCOS or Polycystic ovary syndrome is an imbalance in male and female sex hormones. An excess of androgens can cause ovarian cysts, higher risk of diabetes, weight gain, changes in menstrual period infertility and also hair thinning. Because male hormones are over-represented in polycystic ovary syndrome, women may also experience more hair on their body and face.
Dr. Williams' medical and surgical hair restoration practice is dedicated to the art and science of hair surgery, integrating medical, regenerative PRP and stem cell therapies, and surgical restoration in treating hair loss in men and women. He was one of the earliest cosmetic hair transplant surgeons to incorporate Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) into his cosmetic surgical practice. He is active in the international hair restoration societies teaching hair surgery and FUE to his professional colleagues. He relates easily to his hair loss patients and is the recipient of approximately 10,200 follicular grafts with FUE.
I am so so grateful and want to thank everyone who has contributed to this forum. I am 52 years old, and in June of this year my Obgyn said it was time for me to get off Birth control pills , as I was getting too old and the estrogen levels would be dangerous at this time. I had been on BCP since the age of 18 with a break from the age of 35-38, and always been under the impression that BC pills might cause hair loss, but was totally unaware that when you came off them that the real deal happened. He just casually said, don’t take them and we will see if you are in menopause. Well I did and 2 months later (mid Aug..) I went straight into menopause, hot flashes all day, night sweats, etc., Then came the shedding, TE, as I am to understand. By mid-September the texture of my hair felt strange and the hair on the right side/back of my hair thinned out considerably, and I was developing a bald patch. Having always had very thin hair that I was always self conscious about (I had to wear a wig as a child, as I had monilethrix an inherited hair disease, which went into remission, but the hair loss caused terrible self esteem issues throughout my teenage years.), I cried my eyes out, then went on a quest to find out who to see. Derm, another ObGyn or endocrinologist? From everything that I had read, everyone went to countless doctors to find a cure. Having dealt with my HMO over the years to get a quality specialist in different areas, I knew I would be bald by the time I found the right doctor. Then I came across this forum, like Hope in Aug, I have spent countless hours on the internet in search of a solution. Thanks to her post and Toni on 7/14/08 and Shelleo, I found my answer. I called Dr. Redmond, in New York, and prayed that I could get an appointment right away. My prayers were answered, and I have an appointment this coming Monday 10/28!! I will be getting his book I the next day or so, as recommended, and truly feel, from what I have read, if anyone can help me, he is the one. Thank you for sharing your stories. I will make sure to check back, so I can, too, possibly help someone else.
I too visited the infamous-overpriced Dr Redmond from NYC. I’m on spiro and all the meds for 7 months, going on 8. Forget regrowth, forget halting of shedding, the rate of hair shedding refuses to slow. (I’m also certain its PCOS and not lupus that causing my hairloss, thoroughly medically investigated my hairloss. ) At the start of my treatment, I cut my hair to bout 5 inch lenght, so I’d easily be able to tell thinning versus halt versus regrowth. And all I can say is, I have less hair than I started with. Unfortunately even a physicians intervention is incapable of helping me. To all those out there, atleast this approach before scratching it off your list, its the least you can do.
I had an amazing dermatologist who cured me of my acne b/c she sent me to an endocrynologitst who did agree w/ her that I had PCOS, but when the Aldactone didn’t work, the dermatologist told me “well tha’s that, you have male pattern balding.” She said it like you have two arms and two legs – just a matter of fact, no big deal, but it landed like she sent a single young woman a death sentence. I never went back to her and have not seen a dermatologist since then b/c right after her I went to Dr. Strick at UCLA same kind of stuff (mentioned it in other comment) and am now working w/ my endocrinologist and internal medicine doctors. I agree, you must go to more than one b/c doctors do not know everything and some don’t even know what they are supposed to know for their own field and specialty – they are human too and are good at some things and lacking in othters. Just keep looking until you get someone who cares that this is an upsetting matter for you and will help you find solutions that actually work for you individually instead of a bottle of Rogaine like it’s an apple or 2 aspirins and then call them in the morning.
The pattern of hair loss, especially whether it is focal or diffuse, also may be helpful (Figure 1). The hair-pull test gives a rough estimate of how much hair is being lost.2,4  It is done by grasping a small portion of hair and gently applying traction while sliding the fingers along the hair shafts. Usually one to two hairs are removed with this technique. The hairs are then examined under a microscope (Table 2).
Diphencyprone (DPCP): This medicine is applied to the bald skin. It causes a small allergic reaction. When the reaction occurs, a patient has redness, swelling, and itching. Dermatologists believe this allergic reaction tricks the immune system, causing it to send white blood cells to the surface of the scalp. This fights the inflammation. It also prevents the hair follicles from going to sleep, and causing the hair loss.
The only nonchemical option offered up by the dermatologists I spoke with — short of a surgical hair transplant or platelet-rich plasma therapy, which is like Kim Kardashian’s vampire facial but for your scalp — was the laser comb. First cleared by the FDA in 2009, the HairMax LaserComb is a handheld laser device that is designed to promote hair growth. As the manufacturer explains in a letter to the FDA, “The device provides distributed laser light to the scalp while the comb teeth simultaneously part the user’s hair to ensure the laser light reaches the user’s scalp,” which, in turn, stimulates the hair follicles.
The pattern of hair loss, especially whether it is focal or diffuse, also may be helpful (Figure 1). The hair-pull test gives a rough estimate of how much hair is being lost.2,4  It is done by grasping a small portion of hair and gently applying traction while sliding the fingers along the hair shafts. Usually one to two hairs are removed with this technique. The hairs are then examined under a microscope (Table 2).

Blow dryers, flat irons, and other devices: Frequent use of a blow dryer tends to damage hair. The high heat from a blow dryer can boil the water in the hair shaft leaving the hair brittle and prone to breakage. Dermatologists recommend that you allow your hair to air dry. Then style your hair when it is dry. Dermatologists also recommend limiting the use of flat irons (these straighten hair by using high heat) and curling irons.


I am 31; as a child I had beautiful brown smooth hair with a hint of a wave. As soon as I hit puberty at 13 (1st period on my 13th b-day), my hair turned wavier. Same year, I remember looking down on my legs horrified at the hair I had developed. Only 1 thought came to me: “NOT NORMAL!” Body hair on women is a tricky subject, though, with media heavily influencing what’s considered ‘normal’. My mom, similarly hairy, just told me it’s genetic and normal.
Hopeing somebody may be able to help or even point me in the right direction. I am 21 years old and have a medium length graduated bob,longest layer being shoulder length. Since march this year I noticed the right side of my head felt a lot thinner then the left. So due to this i started to sleep on my left side, havent dyed my hair since april,stopped straightening my hair everyday, let my hair dry naturall, you name it I tried it. However it has now got to the stage that the middle layer of my hair has completly broken off and is only about 4 inches long. I am absolutly heart broken about it, and also cannot understand . I do not want to have to cut all my hair off as it has taken me years to grow out an awful hair cut and do not suit short hair at all so all in all feel very upset and worried. If there is anybody that can help I would really appreaciate it.
As much as 30 percent of women will experience some sort of hair thinning, usually first noticed with age as a skinnier ponytail or a little more visible scalp peeking out. Thick hair screams “youth,” which makes thinning a tough pill to swallow. But there are many ways you can help slow down thinning and hair loss, from eating the right foods to cutting back on stress, even strategically styling your locks. Here, seven ways to stave off hair loss and keep your ‘do looking young and healthy for longer. 
The main symptom of alopecia areata is hair loss. Hair usually falls out in small patches on the scalp. These patches are often several centimeters or less. Hair loss might also occur on other parts of the face, like the eyebrows, eyelashes, and beard, as well as other parts of the body. Some people lose hair in a few places. Others lose it in a lot of spots.
However, I had to post a reply to you when I read what you wrote yesterday. Girl, you have GOT to get a hold of your priorities. Trust me, I know what you are going through. I may not have your same exact situation, but it is close. I think you are so focused on this that you are likely deeply depressed. I am sorry to be so blunt, but I know when I am down, sometimes some straight talk is the just the thing I need to hear to get moving on and making positive changes.
I stumbled on this website accidentally and am amazed at all your stories. I think it’s so wonderful that you all support each other in this way. I’m so sorry that you’re all missing your beautiful hair that you previously had. I am 51 and don’t really know what it would be like to have beautiful hair. I’ve always had what my mother calls “Peter Pan” hair. It never grew up. When I was three years old, I finally started to grow some hair. It got to be the way some other very young childrens’ hair was–very soft, thin, and fine. There just wasn’t a whole lot of it to begin with. You could easily see my scalp in a lot of places on my head. Well, over the course of the next 48 years, the only change in my hair is that I’ve been steadily losing what little there was to start with. I’ve never been able to put it in a pony tail or pig tails because it looked ridiculous and the scrunchy or rubber bands wouldn’t stay in anyway. There just wasn’t enough hair. I’d have to twist the rubber bands around like 20 times to try to get them to stay in–unsuccessfully. I started to notice the diffuse thinning around the age of 30. Now, at 51, people are always asking me if I’m on chemo. I’ve seen a doctor for the depression and anxiety after my separation from my husband 10 years ago and the resulting loss of my 7-year old son, but not for the loss of my hair as I thought (and was told by my internist) that nothing could be done for me. I was very ill with the depression for years, and even now can only work PRN at my hospital; but on the days I’m not working, I don’t leave the house, I don’t eat, I don’t even get out of bed. I don’t think my hair loss is due to the Effexor XR that I take for the depression, but I’m wondering if it could be from the poor nutrition and the fact that I take no supplemental vitamins. Should I go to a doctor even at this late date? The thinning has gotten so severe on my temples, crown, and above my ears that I wonder if improved nutrition would even help. What kind of doctor would I see even if I thought it would help? I’m very embarrassed by the way I look, and very lonely since I can’t date because men want nothing to do with me and most women seem embarrassed to be seen with me. I’ve tried to live a happy life despite the way I look, but I think it would be wonderful if there were actually some way I could be helped to look like a normal woman. Does anyone have any advice? Thank you for taking the time.
I am 34 yrs old and trying to get pregnant, with no luck. I knew since I was 26 that I had multiple cysts on both ovaries so I remained on birth control. Around the second month after I stopped my BCP I noticed my hair thinning. As my periods started to get worse and come about every 2 wks or less my hair loss increased. Within 2 wks I lost 50% of my hair. My scalp is very sore and sensitive and burns. I have seen 3 drs, 2 have told me its normal, 1 dr told me I had lice, then had to go to another dr to find out I didn’t have lice. Is the sore scalp part of the hair loss? If this is related to my hormone levels or the cysts will my hair come back once they are under control? I have so many questions, and there is not a single dr out there who will answer them!

Hi Everyone I thought I was the only person with major hairloss because everywhere I look all I see is beautiful heads of hair. I am 34 years old and my hair started thinning 7 months ago at first I thought it was just my ponytail getting thinner but my hair became horrible with split ends and dryness too (I have always had extremely healthy hair and never had split ends) – I thought I had burnt my hair using a straightener and that’s why it was thinning. However it has gotten worse and worse and I finally visited a doctor. I have had full blood tests for thyroid issues, hormone levels, cholesterol etc etc all were perfectly normal, I had a thyroid antibody test which was at the high end of normal but still within normal range, I had a thyroid function test which was within normal limits however he thought I did have some slight inflammation ie thyroiditis. My doctor said this isn’t causing the hair loss either. I have loads of energy, don’t get tired, eat well am normal weight range the only other thing I have noticed is my eyelashes seem stunted in growth (not thinned out though) and my eyebrows have thinned on the outer edges. My last two nails on both hands have a dark (looks like they have lifted slight) strip just below the white nail part. I am booked to have a stress test, pelvic ultrasound and to see an endocrinologist also to rule out all other possible reasons for hairloss. I am now getting to the point of embarrassment to go out it is soooo thin on top particularly on one side of temple and majorly down the centre where I used to part my hair. HELPPPPPP!!!!!

According to practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine, hair health is tied to two things: kidney energy and the blood, which nourish the hair. The solution: acupuncture and Chinese herbs. While there isn't a lot of hard science to back this up, Maureen Conant, a TCM practitioner at Full Bloom Acupuncture in Seattle, says that she's seen women's hair stop falling out and then gradually regenerate after a few months of weekly treatments.


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Mistakenly thought of as a male disease, around 40% percent of women will suffer from some form of hair loss by the age of 50. A woman’s hair is an important part of her aesthetic make-up. It represents her style and taste, and frames her face while accentuating her best features. Unfortunately, most physicians don’t have answers or solutions for women who begin to lose their hair.  Plano, TX hair restoration surgeon, Dr. Joseph Yaker, understands that this can be extremely catastrophic to a woman’s self-confidence, body image and quality of life. Clinical studies have shown that psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety are more common in people with hair loss, especially women. 
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