Loss of hair from the eyelashes could be caused by an underlying medical condition—or from pulling at your lashes (e.g. from curling lashes, from glues used for false lashes, and from tugging to remove mascara or false lashes). Whatever the reason, we regularly treat thinning lashes by prescribing Latisse®—the first, and only, FDA-approved treatment for thinning lashes. Our patients have reported excellent results (fuller, longer, darker lashes) with this cream. (Note: if you wear contact lenses, you can use Latisse®; you just need to remove the contact lenses before application and re-insert them at least 15 minutes after applying.) Just contact our office to speak with one of DR.DENNIS GROSS about whether Latisse® is right for you. Also important to note: Latisse® is currently in clinical trials as a treatment for hair loss on the scalp. It could be available for this use within the next couple of years.
Not surprisingly, treatments with 5 percent minoxidil work better than treatments with 2 percent minoxidil. A randomized clinical trial published in the American Journal of Clinical Dermatology in 2002 found that, in men with androgenetic alopecia, “5 percent topical minoxidil was clearly superior to 2 percent topical minoxidil and placebo in increasing hair growth.” The difference was actually pretty astounding — after 48 weeks, the men who used 5 percent minoxidil experienced 45 percent more hair growth than the men who used the 2 percent treatment.
Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.
There can be several factors behind hair loss such as environmental effects, aging, too much stress, excessive smoking, nutritional deficiencies, hormonal imbalance, genetic factors, scalp infections, use of wrong or chemically enriched hair products, certain medicines and medical conditions like thyroid disorder, autoimmune diseases, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), iron-deficiency anemia, and chronic illnesses.

I need help. I have been taking Elavil for sleeping for years just reccently I have noticed alot of hair loss and I am so worried. I also take synthroid. and just got off of cytomel because that also causes hair loss.I found out by going on line that taking Elavil and synthroid together it can cause hair loss and heart rhythm disorders. I have been having lots of heart plapations too. Does anyone know if you stop taking Elavil will the hair come back or if you chance snythroid to another drug? let me know we need to stick together on this.

You are what you eat – and that’s true for your hair as well. A diet containing mostly whole foods, especially the skin of plants such as cucumbers, potatoes, peppers, and even bean sprouts are rich in the mineral silica and contribute to hair strength. Foods like lean meats are high in iron and are essential to the protein-based, building blocks of hair growth.


From doing this I have noticed less hair loss, some re-growth and some thickness, more coverage on the crown area, you cannot see the baldspots any more but just a long faint scalp line. But I will not go to a hairdresser or put colour in my hair. I believe this is why my hair is improving. I didn’t spend money on doctors or dermatologists and certainly will never give money to a hairdresser again. I use products with no parabens and sulfates. I hope my post helps; please try not to give up.

I have had thin, fine and ugly hair since I had a hysterectomy in my 20’s. I am 73 now. My mother had very sad hair as did my grandmother. My hair was thick and good until my surgery. I went to 3 dermatologists and they seemed almost embarrassed to look at my hair. I have tried men’s Rogaine but do not see any improvement. I take lots of vitamins and health aids but they don’t seem to help. I also take Premarin and blood pressure meds which may add to the problem. I wear a hair piece which clips into my hair and the lower back and sides and bangs are my real hair. It all mixes together. It is human hair and has a mono scalp which has a part and looks real. It is not a perfect solution but helps me go in public. As you can tell I have pretty much given up on a good solution and from reading what everyone has to say I am afraid that some of us are just destined to have bad hair.


About 2 years ago my hair started thinning. I thought it was because I was in college and stressed. At that point I started going what is known as “CG” in the curly hair world. I no longer color, flat iron, use sulfates and I rarely blow-dry and use silicones. I use shampoos and conditioners with beneficial ingredients, not fillers. After 1.5 years on this Curly Girl routine, I experienced some relief and noticed my hair getting thicker. That lasted a couple months and now I’m back to losing a ton of hair. One day I counted 160 hairs…that was on a decent day. I’m sure I’ve lost 2x that amount before. My hair is noticeably thinner, drier, and it knots. It NEVER use to knot. I think my hair has become finer too, but I’m not positive. It just feels more fragile.
Physical stress can also be a cause for hair loss. Any kind of physical trauma surgery, a severe illness, an accident, even the flu can lead to temporary hair loss. This can trigger a type of hair loss known as Telogen effluvium. Hair loss usually gets noticeable 3-6 months after the trauma but once your body recovers, your hair would start growing back again.
Oral immunosuppressants, like methotrexate and cyclosporine, are another option you can try. They work by blocking the immune system’s response, but they can’t be used for a long period of time due to the risk of side effects, such as high blood pressure, liver and kidney damage, and an increased risk of serious infections and a type of cancer called lymphoma.
I just came across this website, I thought by chance but I think not! I have been having scalp pain, like my skull wanted to crack open. Then the tendersness of my hair folicals when the wind would blow. I started to loose lots of hair so went to my family doctor. All the test were done for Thyroid problems…all turned out what they call “normal”. Have you seen the wide range which is considered normal? How can this be when everyone is so different? I am loosing hair as I sit and write this message. The hair just gently falling onto my shoulder. I need to color my hair as it is time from the length of my silver roots but the last time I had my hair touched up, I thought I was going to die from the pain when the stylist tried to just shampoo the color off. Oh my God! Painful, painful. I used to be a stylist so you can imagine my shock when I was told it wasn’t my Tyroid!
The main type of hair loss in women is the same as it is men. It's called androgenetic alopecia, or female (or male) pattern hair loss. In men, hair loss usually begins above the temples, and the receding hairline eventually forms a characteristic "M" shape; hair at the top of the head also thins, often progressing to baldness. In women, androgenetic alopecia begins with gradual thinning at the part line, followed by increasing diffuse hair loss radiating from the top of the head. A woman's hairline rarely recedes, and women rarely become bald.
Our other recommendation is the HairMax Ultima 12 LaserComb. The comb uses low-level lasers to stimulate hair follicles and modulate dihydrotestosterone (DHT) — a hormone that causes the most common type of hair loss. While it sounds like something from a sci-fi movie, the treatment works, and the dermatologists we consulted reported that their patients saw thicker and longer hair when combined with our top pick. The only catch: The comb isn’t as effective as minoxidil treatments, and at nearly $400, it’s a much bigger investment. Still, it’s the best option if you’re looking for a non-invasive, non-chemical treatment.
Leprosy (Hansen's disease) is a disfiguring disease caused by infection with Mycobacterium leprae bacteria. The disease is spread from person to person through nasal secretions or droplets. Symptoms and signs of leprosy include numbness, loss of temperature sensation, painless ulcers, eye damage, loss of digits, and facial disfigurement. Leprosy is treated with antibiotics and the dosage and length of time of administration depends upon which form of leprosy the patient has.
I’m 28 and suffer from patches of hair loss. recently it has become so bad that i can no longer leave my hair down. it is really distressing for me, especially as I have recently met a guy and I’m not sure whether I should tell him about it or not. Currently when I meet him, I back brush my hair and try my hardest to cover the gaps; this ultimately means i am making things worse for my hair! I dont know what to do
Many factors can contribute to hair disorders. Alopecia, or hair loss, may be caused by medical conditions such as lupus, thyroid disorder, protein or iron deficiencies, or hormonal imbalances.  Hirsutism -- abnormal hair growth in women (such as a beard or chest hair) -- may be caused by ovarian, adrenal, thyroid or pituitary conditions. Identifying the cause, and treating the condition are our goal. 
In the field of aesthetic medicine and cosmetic surgery, Dr. Williams advances the philosophy and disciplines of prevention, longevity and anti-aging medicine. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Hair Restoration Surgery, Fellow of the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery, and a board certified primary care physician. He is and member of the American Academy of Cosmetic Physicians, and a Fellow and active member with numerous leadership committees with the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery. Dr. Williams is the founder and principle physician and surgeon at the Irvine Institute of Medicine and Cosmetic Surgery-Orange County Hair Restoration. Finally, he is a contributor to U.S. News & World Report medical blog.
I just came across this website, I thought by chance but I think not! I have been having scalp pain, like my skull wanted to crack open. Then the tendersness of my hair folicals when the wind would blow. I started to loose lots of hair so went to my family doctor. All the test were done for Thyroid problems…all turned out what they call “normal”. Have you seen the wide range which is considered normal? How can this be when everyone is so different? I am loosing hair as I sit and write this message. The hair just gently falling onto my shoulder. I need to color my hair as it is time from the length of my silver roots but the last time I had my hair touched up, I thought I was going to die from the pain when the stylist tried to just shampoo the color off. Oh my God! Painful, painful. I used to be a stylist so you can imagine my shock when I was told it wasn’t my Tyroid!
I do not believe birth control pills nor rogaine to be an appropriate long lasting answer for hair loss. I do not want to be on drugs for a length of time. Luckily, I have researched how the answer possibly lies within your lifestyle. What you eat, How much you exercise, how much sleep you get and stress you have. As for hormone-caused hair loss, the adrenal gland produces a 1/4 tsp of hormones per year. If you go slightly under or over that amount, a hormone imbalance is the result. If you use table salt, or are on a low-salt diet…you may be negatively affecting your hormones.
I too visited the infamous-overpriced Dr Redmond from NYC. I’m on spiro and all the meds for 7 months, going on 8. Forget regrowth, forget halting of shedding, the rate of hair shedding refuses to slow. (I’m also certain its PCOS and not lupus that causing my hairloss, thoroughly medically investigated my hairloss. ) At the start of my treatment, I cut my hair to bout 5 inch lenght, so I’d easily be able to tell thinning versus halt versus regrowth. And all I can say is, I have less hair than I started with. Unfortunately even a physicians intervention is incapable of helping me. To all those out there, atleast this approach before scratching it off your list, its the least you can do.

Ann, I’m so sorry to hear about your home. That breaks my heart for you. I wish you the best in recovery of your home and blessings on your finances. But I do have to say I think that only losing 20 sounds like a dream! I absolutely know that my TE was triggered by PPD in hair dye. I only wish that I would have figured it out sooner. I was forewarned with itching for a year, no dandruff flaking or anything just itching and that was my body trying to heal itself against the allergy and the all hell broke lose on my head! Please keep me posted propecia; I wouldn’t even look for any improvement for 6 months though. But please be here when you do see it! Have a blessed day!
Hello I gave up years ago and have been wearing hair pieces. If u live in Nj I know someone who will come to your house or you can go to his and he will make you a custom piece depending on your needs. I started the journey again because I noticed that my daughter is starting to resemble me. I want to get treAted so that I have an answer for her. I really can’t afford dr. Redmond but I am giving it a try. I will share my experience.
Eva if you can look at some of Pilar’s post she mentions in one of them a dr she sees in NYC. She loves her and the dr has done a lot for her. I would say there is no doubt it is the Retin A that has caused your loss, but it is probably Telogen Efflivium which is temporary and the recovery is nothing like they say it is. Especially if your scalp is miserable because there is a lot of inflammation that will need to calm down before everything can reset itself. Please try to find her post where she list the derm she sees. She loves her.

In-office laser light treatments or at-home handheld devices, such as the HairMax LaserComb, supposedly grow new hair by stimulating blood flow to the area (think: an amped-up version of a scalp-stimulating shampoo). Just don’t expect the device to make your noggin go from looking like George Costanza’s to Jerry Seinfeld’s. “These lasers won’t grow any new hair. If anything, they may just help you hang on to some of the hair that you already have a bit longer,” says Dr. Joyce.


I’m 42 and I noticed my front top and sides thinning about a year ago – a lot coming out when brushing after washing. I went to the doctor who happened to be African-American (I’m caucasion) and she actually asked me if I wore “corn rows” a lot! Needless to say, she was worthless and just prescribed me something for dandruff, which I do not have! I went to an endocrinologist to see if my thyroid or menopause was the problem – tests turned out honky dorie! Now I can see through the top of my head when the sun shines on it (scar-y) and I’m having to cover over the temple areas with sweeps of hair from the other side (interesting, the right side is much thinner). I will say that I’ve gone through hell and back with a mentally ill young adult but if it was stress, wouldn’t it have come out quicker than just in the last year (I’ve been dealing with his illness for 7 years now)?? I’ve heard that sometimes it takes 2 or 3 blood tests and doctors to finally see that one has thyroid problems. Is this the experience of others, and would I be throwing my money away by seeing my general practitioner?

There are numerous nonsurgical treatments that when combined, can offer significant hair improvements. Dr. Yaker’s TCHR Volumizing Glycolic Acid Shampoo and Conditioner help restore vitality to the hair by deep cleaning the scalp and reestablishing lost moisture content and physiological pH to the scalp and hair. Dr. Yaker has also formulated his own oral supplement, which is a blend of Aminoplex hair repair vitamins. This is made up of amino acids (building blocks of protein) that produce keratin, which makes up close to 97% of our hair. In addition, Dr. Yaker’s specially compounded FDA approved topical medication, Minoxidil (brand name: Rogaine®), is clinically proven to help slow down, stop and even reverse hair loss in women. Other nonsurgical therapies offered are Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) using the advanced LaserCap®, and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) with placenta-derived extracellular matrix therapy to help restore thinning hair. Lastly, Dr. Yaker offers scalp and facial micropigmentation where permanent ink is applied to the skin, creating micro dots that replicate the natural appearance of hair. This is used for the scalp and eyebrows.
Just happened to find this website and have spent 3 hrs getting to know the trials us women go through with or without our hair. I have cried with you, laughed with you and felt your pain. I have frontal fibrosing alopecia and have gone to Stanford Medical Center and saw a dermatologist. I have been using clobetasol 0.05% topical solution on my hair line and sides every night and morning as well as take finasteride 2.5mg daily. Not sure if it is doing anything and what falls out will never grow back with scaring alopecia. If it gets to the point where I can’t hide it anymore I will get a real hair wig. The main thing is how beautiful each and every one of you are! The light you shine towards others makes you beautiful and makes us feel beautiful! Being thankful for what we do have always lifts the spirit and our outward appearance. 

Yes, absolutely. There are certain hair treatments, as well as styles, that can trigger hair loss: tight braids, pigtails, hair weaves, and cornrows can all trigger temporary hair loss called traction alopecia. Chemical relaxers; overuse of chemical colorants; hot-oil treatments; overuse of flat irons, curling irons, or even hot blow-dryers can all damage hair at the root, causing it to fall out. If you are experiencing hair loss, its best to schedule an appointment with our office so that we can help diagnose your issue and determine how best to your hair loss.


You ARE the same inside, but you are also different… you’ve been through a lot and it is so difficult to to stay strong through this experience. I won’t even go into the hair stuff, because it sounds to me that this is not what your post is about. You need to get some really solid support and find something other than your hair to focus on. You need an awesome hair system…and support system. From there, I hope and pray for you, that you will be able to find happiness and balance in your life again. You are a glorious human…don’t doubt that for a moment!

The more research i do about hair color and PPD/PTD allergy the more I think that my hair loss is from that… it has been 7 months now and my hair is growing back. I have not had a tight /itchy scalp/ no more feeling as though bugs are crawling in my hair. I have only gone to the Hair loss dermatologist-whom did not think it was hair dye and the regular doctor to check my hormones. I would love to cover my gray – My hair is very dry at the roots. I went to a stylist(hair loss sprecialist) not much info there-master colorist-she did not know about PPD allergy- I do think stopping coloring my hair has help me keep me from lossing more hair and I think some have grown back. I really would like to color, but I am blonde and gray so I don’t think henna will work. I want to tell you about the reaction I had was first itching and then hair loss. Please take note if that happens to you. Then doctors- they said it was probably not the dye.Wrong! They said Hair loss came with age and hormones. I had all of those tested . Then 6 months later I had the salon dye my hair and a bad reaction bumps and itching and hair loss.Again! I still would like to see a doctor that has knows about hair loss or PPD allergy Or a salon. I have not found anyone in Florida. Keep researching. Mostly I have learned from these web sites and I have educated the doctors and the salon. I know it is all about money and that is how these chemicals stay in the products we are using. I did use rogaine before my first reaction. I thought might have had a chemical reaction from the rogaine and hair dye being used in the same week.
Please help. My hair has always been my pride and joy. I figured since it is pretty damn healthy, it could deal with some bleach damage. And I figured the master stylist who did all the color-corrections would know how much would be too much. I was wrong, and now I want to burst into tears every time I look at my hair or touch it. I just don’t know what to do. my hair has also NEVER been shorter than this and it breaks and falls out. What should i do to regrow hair?

Ironically, taking the hormone levothyroxine to treat an underactive thyroid can contribute to some hair loss, among other side effects, but this seems to be more common within the first month of treatment and more often in children than adults. This hair loss is only temporary and will go away as treatment is continued and thyroid hormone levels stabilize.

I am 31 years old and I been loosing my hair (in the front) for 3 years now. I have seen different 4 different gynecologists and the one I have now she took blood work and other tests and the when all the tests came back everything was fine. I am trying to find a dermologist in my area that accepts my insurance. I just want to know what caused the hair loss and what can be done. It is embarrassing to even go out, when I do go out I make sure that I have a hat on. ????????


Moreover, there are so many subtleties in hair restoration surgery that it's important to choose a physician who specializes in the field, not one who has added "hair restoration" to their menu of services along with other cosmetic surgical procedures, and performs a limited number of the procedures per week.  Experience counts, just like anything in life, and there are many of us in the USA who specialize exclusively in hair restoration, and treat only patients with thinning hair.  It's important to meet personally with your surgeon, and have an in-person evaluation, and a micro-analysis of your scalp to receive the highest level of care possible.  
The views expressed in this article intend to highlight alternative studies and induce conversation. They are the views of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of hims, and are for informational purposes only, even if and to the extent that this article features the advice of physicians and medical practitioners. This article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice.
I have recently noticed my hair thinning about a year ago. I was 19 when it stated and I am now 20. I have seen well over 10 different doctors including dermatologist, gynecologist and your normal everyday doctor. They have done thousands of dollars worth of blood work on me and they have yet to figure out what is going on. I went from loosing 20 hairs a day to 100 and talk about wanting to cry every night. I have lost over 50% of my hair and everyone including my parents blow me off like it completely normal. My doctors have strung me out in every medicine and when that didn’t work they thought it was all in my head. They told me that it’s normal to lose hair and that it will eventually stop. I’ve had doctors laugh and blow me off, I’ve had doctor to prescribe me depression medicine and a psych. I feel like I’m alone and no one understands what I’m going through. I went from being the funny outgoing person who didn’t care what people think to a self conscious and antisocial person I don’t know. It’s been the worst year of my life, sometimes it feels like a nightmare. I just hope the next doctor I see will give me hope that one day I’ll have my think pretty long hair that I use to have.
I got really sick at the age 40, 2 years after my second child was born,I started losing weight,I went from 54kg down to 47kg,my skin was splitting on the backs of my legs,both my hands,I had blisters up my arms ,on the tops of my feet,migraines that would have me vomiting none stop for ten hours,then only to sleep for 2 days to recover,no doctors were interested,I saw 8 and they all wanted me on anxiety medication because I was going through a break up that was there answer to the way I was feeling.No one wanted to listen to me.Almost feeling like

You are what you eat – and that’s true for your hair as well. A diet containing mostly whole foods, especially the skin of plants such as cucumbers, potatoes, peppers, and even bean sprouts are rich in the mineral silica and contribute to hair strength. Foods like lean meats are high in iron and are essential to the protein-based, building blocks of hair growth.
Hair: It’s a natural part of being a human. But when the temperature climbs, and skin is exposed, it’s one of those things that a good many of us want to control. This week, we’re tackling hairlessness, not just the process of hair removal (electric shavers and ingrown-hair treatments and aesthetician-approved tweezers) but also what to buy when you’re losing your hair, and even how to take care of a Sphynx cat. Here, we’re talking to dermatologists and hair-loss doctors about hair-loss treatments that actually work.
Yes, absolutely. There are certain hair treatments, as well as styles, that can trigger hair loss: tight braids, pigtails, hair weaves, and cornrows can all trigger temporary hair loss called traction alopecia. Chemical relaxers; overuse of chemical colorants; hot-oil treatments; overuse of flat irons, curling irons, or even hot blow-dryers can all damage hair at the root, causing it to fall out. If you are experiencing hair loss, its best to schedule an appointment with our office so that we can help diagnose your issue and determine how best to your hair loss.
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I am 20 and have been losing hair since I was 17. It is such a confidence killer. I really do miss my beautiful thick and black hair. Now my hair is thin and a bit gray as well. I only think of it sometimes…but I used to be so depressed i can barely get out of bed. Whenever I am talking to someone, I always wonder if they are looking at my hair. I am currently using Rogaine for Women…it worked one summer when I was following the regimen religiously. However, I am so bad with routines, so now I try to remember to put it on my scalp morning and night. I recently also started to take Shen Min Hir Nutrients…not sure if it works yet. Does anyone have any advice? I really want to get a hair biopsy but I don’t know how. The places I called offered scalp analysis to prepare for hair transplants…which is not something that I am considering. I also saw 2 derms, one didn’t know what was wrong and only offered Rogaine as a solution, and the other said it is androgenic alopecia. I think I might have hormonal problems, but really not that sure. My scalp is always oily and so is my skin. Before my hairloss, I had really itchy scalp. Now it’s still oily but I wash it every other day. I also dye my hair to hide the gray. Sometimes I just feel so ugly and depressed in thinking about my hair. Beautiful hair is the only thing that I want back.
Not surprisingly, treatments with 5 percent minoxidil work better than treatments with 2 percent minoxidil. A randomized clinical trial published in the American Journal of Clinical Dermatology in 2002 found that, in men with androgenetic alopecia, “5 percent topical minoxidil was clearly superior to 2 percent topical minoxidil and placebo in increasing hair growth.” The difference was actually pretty astounding — after 48 weeks, the men who used 5 percent minoxidil experienced 45 percent more hair growth than the men who used the 2 percent treatment.
Each hair develops from a follicle — a narrow pocket in the skin — and goes through three phases of growth. Anagen (A), the active growth phase, lasts two to seven years. Catagen (), the transition phase, lasts about two weeks. During this phase, the hair shaft moves upward toward the skin's surface, and the dermal papilla (the structure that nourishes cells that give rise to hair) begins to separate from the follicle. Telogen (C), the resting phase, lasts around three months and culminates in the shedding of the hair shaft.
Trying to figure out exactly what is causing your hair loss is going to require a little detective work on the part of your physician. Several lab tests are going to need to be done. I’ll make sure to make another post this week about the standard lab tests that should be ordered to start the process. Hopefully you don’t have to bring the list to the doctors office, he/she should know already. I get concerned when women have to bring a list of tests that should be ordered to their doctor. My feeling is that if they don’t know what to order then how are they going to be able to accurately read the results. But… a good doctor is a good doctor, and if you have one that really cares and takes a strong interest in your hair loss with a willingness to work with you in finding the cause then great.
I am a 33yr old woman who has been losing hair for the past few years. I have spent so much money on bad doctors, vitamins that I just did not know what to do? I just had an appointment with Dr. Redmond (NYC) – he prescribed kariva (birth control – low estrogen) and 200 mg of spiro. He told me it will take 2-4months for the shedding to stop and to see some regrowth. I am hopeful. Before him, I went to see Dr. Berkowitz, he put me on a natural steroid pregnolone that REALLy made my hair fall out and created a bald spot. Has any one tried Kariva/mircette?
I’m 42 and I noticed my front top and sides thinning about a year ago – a lot coming out when brushing after washing. I went to the doctor who happened to be African-American (I’m caucasion) and she actually asked me if I wore “corn rows” a lot! Needless to say, she was worthless and just prescribed me something for dandruff, which I do not have! I went to an endocrinologist to see if my thyroid or menopause was the problem – tests turned out honky dorie! Now I can see through the top of my head when the sun shines on it (scar-y) and I’m having to cover over the temple areas with sweeps of hair from the other side (interesting, the right side is much thinner). I will say that I’ve gone through hell and back with a mentally ill young adult but if it was stress, wouldn’t it have come out quicker than just in the last year (I’ve been dealing with his illness for 7 years now)?? I’ve heard that sometimes it takes 2 or 3 blood tests and doctors to finally see that one has thyroid problems. Is this the experience of others, and would I be throwing my money away by seeing my general practitioner?
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