I lost all my body hair for the last year. I have been to over 11 doctors and have learned so much that I am at the point now of just trusting God for direction and the right doctor. Thank you for sharing all your stories. I will be praying for every person on this list of hairloss! I am not giving up. I found this hormone balance natural pill called MACAFEM and I am already feeling better. It helps balance hormones and is not contraindicative with other drugs. Check out the website Macafem.com I’ve also had 11 ;panels of bloodwork done and it shows up normal. I’ve had a heart monitor put on me from the heartpalpitations i used to have and results came back normal. I am 45 years old and been under much stress. But I am finally taking it easy. Exercising evry day and eating a very balanced diet w/out junk food and high fatty food. I know its good to get checked by an endocrinologist and dermatologist. But the most important thing is to Trust God and direct us. I want to add I had hands layed on by a pastor and I felt electricity run through my hands and the anxiety and major heart palpitations ceased and I haven’t had those symptoms since! Thank God! Don’t give up your situation will get better. I have been wearing the most beautful short haired wigs and no one could notice they thought it was my own hair. So after a while I got used to it. I think the less we worry about it the better our body will react. We are putting less stress on ourselves physically and emotionally. Peace to all of you!
Dr. Williams is also the primary investigator in a National Institute of Health (NIH) approved IRB study in regenerative medical treatment procedures with stem cell/stromal therapy for hair loss in androgenetic alopecia. A new study treating scaring and autoimmune (Alopecia Areata) alopecia is expected in 2017. Dr. Williams believes the foundations of health and hair restoration are founded on prevention and wellness. His primary practice is hair restoration surgery in Orange County, and he is involved in teaching medical students and residents from various medical training programs in northern and southern California. He is on the clinical teaching faculty of Western University of Health Science in Pomona, California; and Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine in San Francisco, California, and Chapman University new Health Science teaching facilities.
Blow dryers, flat irons, and other devices: Frequent use of a blow dryer tends to damage hair. The high heat from a blow dryer can boil the water in the hair shaft leaving the hair brittle and prone to breakage. Dermatologists recommend that you allow your hair to air dry. Then style your hair when it is dry. Dermatologists also recommend limiting the use of flat irons (these straighten hair by using high heat) and curling irons.
You are what you eat – and that’s true for your hair as well. A diet containing mostly whole foods, especially the skin of plants such as cucumbers, potatoes, peppers, and even bean sprouts are rich in the mineral silica and contribute to hair strength. Foods like lean meats are high in iron and are essential to the protein-based, building blocks of hair growth.
Harklinikken (“hair clinic” in Danish) inspires great loyalty. Four out of five users come as referrals from satisfied customers, said Lars Skjoth, the company’s founder and chief scientist. The results are certainly compelling. After four months of daily application — that is, working the tea-colored tonic into the hair section by section, then letting it sit on the scalp for six hours — most users regain at least 30 percent of lost density, and some as much as 60 percent, according to company figures.
Each day the scalp hair grows approximately 0.35 mm (6 inches per year), while the scalp sheds approximately 100 hairs per day, and more with shampooing.1 Because each follicle passes independently through the three stages of growth, the normal process of hair loss usually is unnoticeable. At any one time, approximately 85 to 90 percent of scalp follicles are in the anagen phase of hair growth. Follicles remain in this phase for an average of three years (range, two to six years).1 The transitional, or catagen, phase of follicular regression follows, usually affecting 2 to 3 percent of hair follicles. Finally, the telogen phase occurs, during which 10 to 15 percent of hair follicles undergo a rest period for about three months. At the conclusion of this phase, the inactive or dead hair is ejected from the skin, leaving a solid, hard, white nodule at its proximal shaft.2 The cycle is then repeated.

There is really sadness in my soul today. It is just like I’m constantly searching for hair with no answer in sight. I’m just having a really bad day and want to feel better about this situation. I keep reminding my self it is not an arm or leg or foot or hand I can continue in life without physical limitations. I have my sight and hearing and senses. And health but stress is really affecting. I’ve have been working out so hard just trying to relish in that. I am slim and feel good in my clothes. I just keep reminding myself of all these wonderful blessings but I have sadness in my soul. I miss my hair more than I can even put into words. I miss it I miss it I miss it I miss it. Just feel desperate today. I wish I could just touch it and feel the density I once had. I just had to write and get this off my chest. Why are there no answers? Why? Why can’t this be fixed without horrific side affects and a lifelong commitment to drugs and potions! I miss my hair. I miss who I was 2 years. That person no longer exists. And I miss her. I miss the way I use to look forward to getting up and not knowing what was in store but whatever happened I could tackle and handle. But not now I crumble I’m intimidated, I’m insecure, I’m hesitant, I’m preoccupied, I’m hurt, I’m damaged, I’m a shell of the person I used to be.

Well, I got the news yesterday – at 61, vital and as healthy as anyone could possible ever wish to be, yep, hair thinning on the vertex and allopecia of the eyebrows, the latter are almost gone. It started probably 10 months ago, still donot know exactly why, but laser skin therapy on my face and arms for those liver spots may have triggered it. I went to see Dr. Shelly Friedman here in Scottsdale, AZ. His assistant is very, very knowledgeable and extremely empathetic and friendly. Long and short: no cure, no idea where it really comes from. BUT, now there is laser therapy, the so-called Laser Cap, FDA approved etc. You put it on 3x/wk for 45 min. at home, you purchase the cap, and within 3 months your hair really becomes fuller and actually it already starts to grow back within 4 weeks. That would be a good solution for the head. You will have to continue doing this for the rest of your life, or until the scientists have found a different solution.
Minoxidil (Rogaine). This is an over-the-counter (nonprescription) medication approved for men and women. It comes as a liquid or foam that you rub into your scalp daily. Wash your hands after application. At first it may cause you to shed hair as hair follicles. New hair may be shorter and thinner than previous hair. At least six months of treatment is required to prevent further hair loss and to start hair regrowth. You need to keep applying the medication to retain benefits.
i also have learned that most people are low in their vitamin d levels, which may also contribute to hair loss. i actually had labs done to check for my vitamin d level, by a cardiologist. my heart is fine, thankfully, but she did tell me to take 2000i.u. daily of vitamin d3, specifically. when i researched about it, i found the possible hair connection. so i do take that daily. i will also be buying vitamin b6 and 12 and biotin. and i will research the gut connection because biologically speaking, it makes sense. i will return with another post in a few months and update.

Figure 2 is used with permission from Utah Valley Family Practice Residency Program.Figures 3 and 10 are used with permission from the Utah Valley Family Practice Residency Program. Figure 5 is used with permission from Mark Luba, M.D., Good Samaritan Family Practice Residency. Figure 6 is used with permission from Richard Usatine, M.D., UCLA. Figures 9 and 11 are reprinted with permission from the American Academy of Dermatology.


I took spironolactone several years ago, and after 3 days got tinnitus (ringing in ears) permanently. Quit using it. Now, I take Fo-ti, Beta sitosterol, saw palmetto, and black cohosh. Also don’t use commercial hair dyes, as they made more hair fall out and if you have a yeast infection, take yeast defense as an itchy scalp from yeast (think too much sugar in diet) will make your hair fall out. Fructis has come out with a shampoo called Fall Fight that seems to help. My hair loss has stopped, although the volume has not come back. Look for solutions on your own, plenty of articles on the internet. Good luck!
Trying to figure out exactly what is causing your hair loss is going to require a little detective work on the part of your physician. Several lab tests are going to need to be done. I’ll make sure to make another post this week about the standard lab tests that should be ordered to start the process. Hopefully you don’t have to bring the list to the doctors office, he/she should know already. I get concerned when women have to bring a list of tests that should be ordered to their doctor. My feeling is that if they don’t know what to order then how are they going to be able to accurately read the results. But… a good doctor is a good doctor, and if you have one that really cares and takes a strong interest in your hair loss with a willingness to work with you in finding the cause then great.
Yes, absolutely. There are certain hair treatments, as well as styles, that can trigger hair loss: tight braids, pigtails, hair weaves, and cornrows can all trigger temporary hair loss called traction alopecia. Chemical relaxers; overuse of chemical colorants; hot-oil treatments; overuse of flat irons, curling irons, or even hot blow-dryers can all damage hair at the root, causing it to fall out. If you are experiencing hair loss, its best to schedule an appointment with our office so that we can help diagnose your issue and determine how best to your hair loss.

The topical sensitizers, diphencyprone or squaric acid dibutylester, have been used in those suffering from recalcitrant alopecia areata or those with more than 50% hair loss. The goal of treatment is to create an allergic contact dermatitis of the scalp. This alteration in the immune response occasionally is accompanied by hair regrowth. The efficacy of the topical sensitizers has been demonstrated in both young children and adults, but it probably works less than half the time. Recent success using oral janus kinase inhibitors, including tofacitinib, ruxolitinib, and baricitinib, have been shown to be efficacious in severe, extensive alopecia areata in adults, but long-term therapy has potential side effects. The durability of response to these medications is variable, and most patients experience recurrence of hair loss after discontinuation. Perhaps topical therapy with these types of drugs may be available in the near future.
THE TREATMENTS If no trigger is present, it’s likely you have androgenetic alopecia, a hereditary condition that causes the hair follicles to get progressively thinner over the years. The most effective topical medication for the condition is minoxidil (brand name Rogaine), the only treatment for hair loss in women that has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

Some other autoimmune diseases can also lead to hair loss. Lupus, which affects many different systems of the body, is one of them. Symptoms include fatigue, headache, painful joints, anemia, abnormal blood clotting, and hair loss, according to the website LiveStrong. The disease is usually triggered by environmental factors like exposure to the sun. Hashimoto’s disease, which occurs when the immune system attacks the thyroid gland causing an underactive thyroid, can also result in hair loss.
when i was 24, went to so. america to visit family. they hadn’t seen me since my last visit, which was when i was 17. there was a guy who i had liked and hung out with when i spent my 17th summer there and was excited to see him once again, “as an adult”. i think it was the second day or so of hanging out with him when he says to me: “hey, i noticed you’re losing your hair”. i was beyond embarrassed at that moment and all i could muster out was, “yeah, i know”. thanks for pointing it out there buddy. next came anger mixed with that embarrassment. i felt, and still feel, that people stare at my head and notice my thinning hair when they are talking to me. when i came back to the states a few weeks later, the first thing i did was make an appt with my pcp. she referred me to an endocrinologist who found my testosterone level slightly elevated. it was in the 70 range. i didn’t have masculinization going on so she told me she didn’t want to put me on medication and to return if i noticed in increase or changes in symptoms. 

I am so so grateful and want to thank everyone who has contributed to this forum. I am 52 years old, and in June of this year my Obgyn said it was time for me to get off Birth control pills , as I was getting too old and the estrogen levels would be dangerous at this time. I had been on BCP since the age of 18 with a break from the age of 35-38, and always been under the impression that BC pills might cause hair loss, but was totally unaware that when you came off them that the real deal happened. He just casually said, don’t take them and we will see if you are in menopause. Well I did and 2 months later (mid Aug..) I went straight into menopause, hot flashes all day, night sweats, etc., Then came the shedding, TE, as I am to understand. By mid-September the texture of my hair felt strange and the hair on the right side/back of my hair thinned out considerably, and I was developing a bald patch. Having always had very thin hair that I was always self conscious about (I had to wear a wig as a child, as I had monilethrix an inherited hair disease, which went into remission, but the hair loss caused terrible self esteem issues throughout my teenage years.), I cried my eyes out, then went on a quest to find out who to see. Derm, another ObGyn or endocrinologist? From everything that I had read, everyone went to countless doctors to find a cure. Having dealt with my HMO over the years to get a quality specialist in different areas, I knew I would be bald by the time I found the right doctor. Then I came across this forum, like Hope in Aug, I have spent countless hours on the internet in search of a solution. Thanks to her post and Toni on 7/14/08 and Shelleo, I found my answer. I called Dr. Redmond, in New York, and prayed that I could get an appointment right away. My prayers were answered, and I have an appointment this coming Monday 10/28!! I will be getting his book I the next day or so, as recommended, and truly feel, from what I have read, if anyone can help me, he is the one. Thank you for sharing your stories. I will make sure to check back, so I can, too, possibly help someone else.
Thank you so much ladies, I am grateful I was able to find this website. Can anyone suggest a Doctor in the South Florida Area ( West Palm Beach, Ft. Lauderdale, Hollywood or Miami)? I have seem countless of Doctors in the past 20 years; felt like none really cared or took an honest interest. The last Doctor I visited didn’t even bother to see me in person, she just called me on the phone and told me nothing can be done, use Rogaine if you want, she said. Needless to say my condition is serious. After this I am at the point of giving up but if I could find a Doctor that really cares I am willing to try again. Any advise is welcome. Thanks again.

Diffuse female hair thinning and hair loss during premenopausal age is usually not heredity. It is usually caused by hormonal imbalances seeing in PCOS or thyroid disorder, nutritional deficiency (low iron), and stress. Women with PCOS produce high levels of androgens such as testosterones and DHEAS. The ratio of LH and FSH is also more than 2. Make sure you get your sex hormones check if you notice your hair thinning.

×